Raman spectroscopy


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Raman spectroscopy

[′räm·ən spek′träs·kə·pē]
(spectroscopy)
Analysis of the intensity of Raman scattering of monochromatic light as a function of frequency of the scattered light; the information obtained is useful for determining molecular structure.
References in periodicals archive ?
The session will cover topics including the use of Raman spectroscopy and bulk acoustic wave sensors in clinical diagnostics.
This accessory combines a Raman spectrometer with the DHR to enable simultaneous collection of rheology and Raman spectroscopy data.
But Raman spectroscopy uses lasers, which do not require radiation monitoring and involves less paperwork, she said.
With its non-destructive properties and resistance to water interference, the benefits of using Raman spectroscopy for analysis are widely recognised in the fields of life sciences and pharmaceuticals.
Visitors are encouraged to visit Tornado in Hall A2, Stand 321, where they will be showcasing the HyperFlux PRO Plus Raman spectroscopy system.
The aim of this study is to observe A[beta] by Raman spectroscopy. To improve Raman intensity, we focused on Membrane Surface-Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy (MSERS) method, which has developed to investigate the dynamic behaviors of phospholipid membranes [11].
Due to its capability of providing fingerprints of molecule vibration, Raman spectroscopy has a wide variety of applications in chemistry, biology, and medicine [1].
Raman spectroscopy offers benefits that are important for the process control in terms of quality control in production, in use [7], but also for forensic identification [4].
Optical techniques such as absorption spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy have been claimed to be consistent, reliable, rapid, and low-cost analyses of chemical species in the industrial field for analytical instrumentation [5-7], which could successfully meet the PAT requirements.
In particular, we highlight the innovative studies of three important techniques, spontaneous Raman spectroscopy, CRS, and SERS, and their potential to transition from bench to bedside.
The paper says that the element vanadium combined with Raman spectroscopy would help confirm traces of organic material, or the very basis of life.