Raamses

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Raamses

(rāăm`sēz), in the Bible, city of the eastern delta of Egypt, built by Hebrew slave labor. It was rebuilt by Ramses II. The Ramses in the books of Genesis and Numbers is the region of the central eastern delta.
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The column of inscription on the right shoulder includes a cartouche with the prenomen Ramesses II and reads: "Lord of the two Lands, User-maat-re Setepen-re".
The new scans of the royal mummies have produced never-before-seen images of Tutankhamun, Ramesses III, and other New Kingdom pharaohs.
Interestingly enough, Tyson-Smith never addresses the aquiline noses and thin lips of the Libyans depicted in the tombs of Seti I and Ramesses III.
Ramesses II is regarded as one of Egypt's most powerful pharaohs and was nicknamed 'the Great Ancestor' by his successors.
He entered the room, and on closer inspection discovered that the bodies were those of many of the most celebrated pharaohs of the New Kingdom, identified by dockets upon the bandages and/or upon the coffins: (17) Thutmosis IV, Amenhotep III, Merenptah, Sethi II, Siptah, Ramesses IV, V and VI, and an unknown woman, maybe Queen Tawosret.
The Enigmatic Netherworld Books of the Solar-Osirian Unity: Cryptographic Compositions in the Tombs of Tutankhamun, Ramesses VI and Ramesses IX.
Researchers at the Eurac-Institute for Mummies and the Iceman say Ramesses III was murdered with a slash to the throat.
Dr Hawass believes Seti I was trying to build a secret 'tomb within a tomb' at the end of the tunnel when he died, and that Ramesses II halted proceedings to bury his father.
The Leiden Hymns to Amun and Thebes) from the fifty-second year of the reign of Ramesses II (1279-1213 BCE) [a.
1) was once a fragmentary Egyptian statue of the Pharaoh Ramesses IV (twentieth Dynasty, c.
Ramesses Egypt's Greatest Pharaoh Joyce Tyldesley Viking 16.
Finally, Aaron Smith's unique contribution addresses "Narrative Methodologies in Ancient Egyptian Art History: The Military Reliefs of Ramesses II at Luxor" as he examines the narrative present in those representations while discussing lucidly what makes narrative art and suggesting how to determine if the reliefs present history.