Ramoth-gilead


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Ramoth-gilead

(rā`mŏth-gĭl`ēăd) or

Ramoth in Gilead,

city of ancient Palestine, E of the Jordan. It is named in the Bible as a place of refuge and as Ahab's last battlefield. It also appears as Ramah.
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Among the topics are new light on linguistic diversity in pre-Achaemenid Aramaic: wandering Arameans or language spread, whether material evidence of Aramean influences and presences in Iron Age Judah and Israel can be found, the Battle of Ramoth-gilead and the rise of the Aramean hegemony in the southern Levant during the second half of the ninth century BCE, Babylonian scribal practices in rural contexts: a linguistic survey of the documents of Judean exiles and West Semites in Babylonia (CUSAS 28 and BaAr 6), how Mesopotamian Ahiqar the Wise was: a search for Ahiqar in cuneiform texts, and Arameans in Egypt.
They plan to recapture the territory of Ramoth-gilead. Four hundred of the prophets based in Samaria claim that the kings of Judah and Israel will prevail.
Micaiah prophesies destruction and disaster for the proposed battle at Ramoth-gilead. This is when Zedekiah ben Kenaanah strikes Micaiah and claims that he (Zedekiah) really speaks for God.
Kedesh, Shechem, Hebron, Bezer, Ramoth-Gilead, and Golan were designated for refuge: one city for every two of twelve tribes.
Ramoth-Gilead (the really bad) was raised in a small Texas community.
The citadel of Ramoth-gilead stood guard over Israel's territory east of the Jordan River, on a site so strategic that the kings of Israel and neighboring Aram repeatedly fought to hold it, take it, or take it back.
And he [Ahaziah] went with Joram ben-Ahab to war with Hazael, King of Aram, at Ramoth-gilead, and the Aramaeans smote Joram.
Joram had been guarding Ramoth-gilead, he and all Israel, because of Hazael, King of Aram.
The sequence of events at Ramoth-gilead is not clear.
Joram, again like his father, was wounded at Ramoth-gilead. This time the wound was not mortal, but it was severe enough for him to retire from the fray.
Nahman said: Ahab was equally balanced, since it is written, The Lord asked, 'Who will entice Ahab so that he will march and fall at Ramoth-gilead?' Then one said thus and another said thus (22:20).
Chapter 22 presents further complexities as Ahab consulted prophets before going to battle: So the king of Israel gathered the prophets, about four hundred men, and asked them, 'Shall I march upon Ramoth-gilead for battle, or should I not?' 'March,' they said, 'and the Lord will deliver [it] into Your Majesty's hands.' Then Jehoshaphat asked, 'Isn't there another prophet of the Lord here through whom we can inquire?' And the king of Israel answered Jehoshaphat, 'There is one more man through whom we can inquire of the Lord; but I hate him, because he never prophesies anything good for me, but only misfortune--Micaiah son of Imlah' (22:6-8).