Rampion


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Wikipedia.

Rampion

 

a plant of the family Campanulaceae, most frequently Campanula rapunculus. Rampion is a biennial having a turnip-like thickened root. The whitish flowers are in a long raceme. Rampion grows in Europe and Ciscaucasia; it is encountered in meadows and along roads and the edges of forests and fields. The roots are used in the same way as radishes, and the young leaves are used in salads.

REFERENCE

I pat’ev, A. N. Ovoshchnye rasteniia zemnogo shara. Minsk, 1966.
Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Rampion offshore wind farm is owned by E.ON, Green Investment Group and Enbridge.
The [pounds sterling]1.3bn Rampion development is the first wind farm off the south coast of England and JDR's North East team will design and manufacture 142 km of inter-array cables for the project.
The Huxley character most frequently conflated with Lawrence is Mark Rampion in Point Counter Point.
In Point Counter Point the exemplar of balanced reason and intuition is Rampion who is also the spokesperson for ending class divisions so that a meritocracy would be favored over an aristocracy.
To impress Mark Rampion, Spandrell purchases a new recording of heilige Dankgesang eines Genesenen an die Gottheit in der ludischen Tonart; according to Spandrell, it "proves all kinds of things--God, the soul, goodness--inescapably" (PCP 591).
male and female slaves, which they take in quantities, white sandalwood, pepper, quicksilver, vermilion, opium, azernefe, cloves, mace, nutmeg, wide and narrow muslins, and Kling cloths in the fashion of Siam, camlets, rosewater, carpets, brocades from Cambay, white cowries, wax, Borneo camphor, pachak which are roots like dry rampion, [and] gall-nuts (gualhas).
In Point Counter Point (1928), Huxley's spokesperson, Mark Rampion, condemns "Americanization" as the deification of "Machinery and Alfred Mond or Henry Ford ...
You'll find something to interest the whole family, with about 20 different gardens to explore, from the unusual vegetable garden with its skirret, rampion, salsify and scorzonera crops from centuries ago, to the no-dig garden, the soil of which has never been turned over.
Mark Rampion, Huxley's Lawrentian spokesperson in the 1928 novel, could have written these essays the following year.
Botanic names, boursette, pasquerette, pimprenelle, responsette, groiseliers (lamb's lettuce, daisy, burnet, rampion, and currant), are qualified by visual or medicinal characteristics.
Huxley's glaringly Lawrentian Rampion, on the other hand, argues that