Jarrell, Randall

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Jarrell, Randall

(jərĕl`), 1914–65, American poet and critic, b. Nashville, Tenn., grad. Vanderbilt Univ. (B.A., 1935; M.A., 1938). His poetry, reflecting an unusually sensitive and tragic view of life, includes Blood for a Stranger (1942), The Seven-League Crutches (1951), and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). His best-known poem, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner," was a mediation on his experiences during World War II. In 1953 his critical essays were collected and published as Poetry and the Age. Jarrell's other works include several delightful children's books; Pictures from an Institution (1954), a satirical novel set in a progressive women's college; and A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), a collection of essays and fables.

Bibliography

See his complete poems (1969); posthumous collections of his criticism and essays, The Third Book of Criticism (1969), Kipling, Auden & Co. (1980), and No Other Book (ed. by B. Leithauser, 1999); his letters (ed. by M. Jarrell, 1985); memoir by his wife, Mary Jarrell (1999); studies by R. Lowell et al., ed. (1967), C. Beck (1983), J. Bryant (1986), and S. Burt (2003); bibliography by S. Wright (1986).

Jarrell, Randall

(1914–65) poet, literary critic; born in Nashville, Tenn. He was a student of John Crowe Ransom and Robert Penn Warren at Vanderbilt University. His academic career was interrupted by his service with the Army Air Corps in World War II (1942–46). His war poems attracted national attention in the 1940s; The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960) won a National Book Award. Poetry and the Age (1953), a reevaluation of modern American poets, established Jarrell as a critic with unfailing judgment and a witty style, while his one novel Pictures from an Institution (1954), is regarded as a minor classic of the academic-novel genre. Most of his career he taught at the University of North Carolina (1947–51; 1953–54; 1961–65). He was consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress (1956–58). His premature death resulted from his being hit by a car.
References in periodicals archive ?
Randall Jarrell, another poet- critic who would meet a tragic end, writes in an essay published in 1951 that "the poet is a condemned man for whom the state will not even buy breakfast.
Randall Jarrell, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner" (1945), rpt.
As Lowell and Bishop's friend Randall Jarrell used to say: Anybody who cares about poetry will want to read it.
Randall Jarrell, "Poetry in War and Peace," in Kipling, Auden & Co.
For example, Marianne Moore titles her review "A Modest Expert" and calls Bishop "spectacular in being unspectacular" (177); Randall Jarrell describes Bishop's work as "attractively and unassumingly good .
Fifty-five years ago when Randall Jarrell cast a sour glance at "The Age of Criticism," critics knew that the age deserved its name precisely because they felt that literature overshadowed their own expository efforts.
Most of the essays are either reviews of individual works or retrospective appreciations of other writers, examples including Rainier Maria Rilke, Franz Kafka, Stefan Zweig, Hans Hagen, Herman Broch, Rudyard Kipling, Randall Jarrell, Bertolt Brecht, W.
my open coffin', writes Lowell in one of his sonnets (quoted by Gareth Reeves in his essay on Notebook), while Michael Hinds shows us Randall Jarrell requesting a title-page like 'the early 18th century tombstones Gottfried saw at Stanhope' (p.
In graduate school I studied Randall Jarrell, the wonderful mid-twentieth-century critic and poet, who devoted an essay to the pleasures of second-tier writers.
Something like these childish memories, though with a decidedly more sinister cast, seems to have led the poet and critic Randall Jarrell to his cranky appraisal of Auden's religious awakening.
Randall Jarrell, called by Robert Lowell "the most heartbreaking poet of his generation," explores in his poems "the unknown, unwanted life.
Randall Jarrell (American poet) One most obvious fact about grownups, to a child, is they forgotten what it is like to be a child.