Jarrell, Randall

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Jarrell, Randall

(jərĕl`), 1914–65, American poet and critic, b. Nashville, Tenn., grad. Vanderbilt Univ. (B.A., 1935; M.A., 1938). His poetry, reflecting an unusually sensitive and tragic view of life, includes Blood for a Stranger (1942), The Seven-League Crutches (1951), and The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960). His best-known poem, "The Death of the Ball Turret Gunner," was a mediation on his experiences during World War II. In 1953 his critical essays were collected and published as Poetry and the Age. Jarrell's other works include several delightful children's books; Pictures from an Institution (1954), a satirical novel set in a progressive women's college; and A Sad Heart at the Supermarket (1962), a collection of essays and fables.

Bibliography

See his complete poems (1969); posthumous collections of his criticism and essays, The Third Book of Criticism (1969), Kipling, Auden & Co. (1980), and No Other Book (ed. by B. Leithauser, 1999); his letters (ed. by M. Jarrell, 1985); memoir by his wife, Mary Jarrell (1999); studies by R. Lowell et al., ed. (1967), C. Beck (1983), J. Bryant (1986), and S. Burt (2003); bibliography by S. Wright (1986).

Jarrell, Randall

(1914–65) poet, literary critic; born in Nashville, Tenn. He was a student of John Crowe Ransom and Robert Penn Warren at Vanderbilt University. His academic career was interrupted by his service with the Army Air Corps in World War II (1942–46). His war poems attracted national attention in the 1940s; The Woman at the Washington Zoo (1960) won a National Book Award. Poetry and the Age (1953), a reevaluation of modern American poets, established Jarrell as a critic with unfailing judgment and a witty style, while his one novel Pictures from an Institution (1954), is regarded as a minor classic of the academic-novel genre. Most of his career he taught at the University of North Carolina (1947–51; 1953–54; 1961–65). He was consultant in poetry to the Library of Congress (1956–58). His premature death resulted from his being hit by a car.
References in periodicals archive ?
Blackmur died of chronic vascular disease at 61; the manic-depressive Randall Jarrell killed himself by stepping in front of a speeding car on a nighttime road at 51; the mad, doped, and sodden Delmore Schwartz lasted to 52; the manic-depressive Sylvia Plath stuck her head in an oven at 30, leaving two small children; the manic-depressive Robert Lowell, spared for now, would die 12 years later of a heart attack at 60.
Randall Jarrell, another poet- critic who would meet a tragic end, writes in an essay published in 1951 that "the poet is a condemned man for whom the state will not even buy breakfast." (32) The drama of Jarrell's rhetoric may owe something to his relationship with Hannah Arendt.
(ed.), [1958] 2002, Randall Jarrell's book of short stories, New York Review Book, New York.
Randall Jarrell's allegories nevertheless urge us to imagine ourselves changing.
Bidart's poem emphasizes exactly what official lyrics must suppress: the ever-present fear of assassination; the dominant role violence and white supremacy have played in American history; and the disappointment so many have had occasion to feel in America itself, a conceptual and physical space filled, as Randall Jarrell once said, with "the ruins of hopes." (9) Although Bidart constructs his counter-tradition by revising a diversity of prior texts, I will focus on the presence of four main literary precursors: James Shirley, Walt Whitman, Allen Ginsberg, and Robert Lowell.
It is a delight to read Randall Jarrell's analysis of Housman, Cleanth Brooks' magisterial study of Eliot, R.
"Disturbing Randall Jarrell. "American Literary History 16 (2004) : 350-52.
Rose reminds us that the war produced Joseph Heller, Norman Mailer, James Jones, Randall Jarrell, Kurt Vonnegut, and many more.
Of course, most readers will better recognize the Fugitives as the "new critics." However, Stanwood does not focus on the critical work of the Fugitives, but rather their poetry and its close resemblances to Donne's "line of wit." Moreover, he demonstrates how Donne's legacy--vis-a-vis the Fugitives--continued to influence the early poetry of writers like Randall Jarrell, John Berryman, and Robert Lowell during the twentieth century.
Justice Harms and Jarman mimic the fine close readings of poet/scholar Randall Jarrell whose essays like these were known for their accessibility and enthusiasm.
Description is divided into four sections: 1) definitions and classifications of the concept of description, 2) the relationship between observation and the study of the mind, including abstraction and epiphany, 3) history and politics surrounding Bishop's work, through the lens of Randall Jarrell's 1947 interview, and 4) the relationships between binaries such as time and narrative and travel and tourism.
With style, humor, and candor, Words in Air charts the pair's gradual rise to fame in the literary world over thirty years, from their initial meeting at the New York apartment of poet-critic Randall Jarrell in 1947, until Lowell's sudden death from a heart attack in the back of a New York taxicab in 1977.