Rarotonga

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Rarotonga

(rärōtông`gä, rărətŏng`gə), formerly

Goodenough's Island,

volcanic island (2006 pop. 15,153), 26 sq mi (67 sq km), South Pacific, capital of the Cook IslandsCook Islands,
island group (2006 pop. 19,569), 90 sq mi (234 sq km), S Pacific, SE of Samoa; a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand. It consists of 15 small islands and is comprised of two main groups, the Southern (or Lower) Cook islands (Rarotonga,
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. The most southwesterly of the group, it is also the largest, most important, and by far the most populous. Avarua is the administrative seat and chief town and port of Rarotonga. Citrus fruit, copra, and pearl shell are exported. Tourism is an important industry. Rarotonga was visited in 1823 by the English missionary John WilliamsWilliams, John,
1796–1839, English missionary, called the Apostle of Polynesia. Under the London Missionary Society he went (1817) to the Society Islands. He discovered Rarotonga in 1823 and founded missions there.
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. The island was almost completely devastated by a hurricane in 1987.

Rarotonga

an island in the S Pacific, in the SW Cook Islands: the chief island of the group. Chief settlement: Avarua. Pop.: 12 188 (2001). Area: 67 sq. km (26 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
ck, for the Rarotongan Beach Resort and Spa or phone +682 31218 for Paradise Cove.
The Rarotongan Dive Centre packages start at around pounds 29.
Although Tamatoa also talked at length with some Rarotongan leaders, one of the Raiatean teachers left on the island was more influential in encouraging the chiefs of the three districts to destroy their god-images in 1824 (Bourne n.
The Seasonality of Power: The Rarotongan Legend of Tangiia, Journal of the Polynesian Society, 98(3): 331-347.
The model is based on environmental factors, but the Rarotongan production system is as much a product of history as of environment.
Since that time many of the taro terraces (or pondfields; in Rarotongan, repotaro, a term that refers to both the individual terraces and to the complex of terraces that constitute an independent system) have been brought back into use, a situation which made recording and mapping them very much easier, but complicates their status as precontact sites.
Alistair Campbell's Tia (Reed Pacific Writers Series), a late Rarotongan novel about Rarotonga, challenges realism far more rigorously than Temple's work, operating a sort of magic realism that sits very comfortably in its Pacific context and completes the trilogy begun by The Frigate Bird (1989) and Sidewinder (1991).
I was unaware of Pomare's large chapel at the time of writing and so assumed a Rarotongan chapel built in 1824, containing two pulpits and originally intended to be 600 feet long, was without precedent.
Since this academic field only began in the 1960s at Australian National University as an offshoot of imperial history during the beginnings of decolonization in the south Pacific, the time depth is not enormous, despite the somewhat anomalous inclusion of nineteenth century writings by the Rarotongan missionary Ta'unga edited and translated by Ron and Marjorie Crocombe.
He contributed the top end of a Rarotongan 'staff god' that is virtually identical to one in the Otago Museum in Dunedin, New Zealand, illustrated by Barrow (1972, Fig.
By this time Samoan, Rarotongan and Aneityumese teachers had succeeded in encouraging the majority of Erakor and Pango villagers to convert.
Pascht demonstrates how the future role of chiefs in Rarotonga (Cook Islands) is shaped by a dynamic tension between the different projects and interests pursued by titleholders and non-chiefly Rarotongans while Schieder explores how a 'coup culture' has developed in Fiji as a defined group of elites deliberately create instability for their own political ends.