Rarotonga

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Rarotonga

(rärōtông`gä, rărətŏng`gə), formerly

Goodenough's Island,

volcanic island (2006 pop. 15,153), 26 sq mi (67 sq km), South Pacific, capital of the Cook IslandsCook Islands,
island group (2006 pop. 19,569), 90 sq mi (234 sq km), S Pacific, SE of Samoa; a self-governing state in free association with New Zealand. It consists of 15 small islands and is comprised of two main groups, the Southern (or Lower) Cook islands (Rarotonga,
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. The most southwesterly of the group, it is also the largest, most important, and by far the most populous. Avarua is the administrative seat and chief town and port of Rarotonga. Citrus fruit, copra, and pearl shell are exported. Tourism is an important industry. Rarotonga was visited in 1823 by the English missionary John WilliamsWilliams, John,
1796–1839, English missionary, called the Apostle of Polynesia. Under the London Missionary Society he went (1817) to the Society Islands. He discovered Rarotonga in 1823 and founded missions there.
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. The island was almost completely devastated by a hurricane in 1987.

Rarotonga

an island in the S Pacific, in the SW Cook Islands: the chief island of the group. Chief settlement: Avarua. Pop.: 12 188 (2001). Area: 67 sq. km (26 sq. miles)
References in periodicals archive ?
Leslie (1980) provides extensive data on Rarotongan soil types, which when combined with the yields and fallow periods of major precontact crops suited to each soil type provides a rough model of productive potential.
It remains underdeveloped and limited, but these limitations are themselves instructive, and lead to a more subtle understanding of precontact Rarotongan production.
In short, the model takes no account of history, which the Rarotongan production system cannot be understood without.
Many poorer soils would quite probably not have been fully utilised, while some of the better soils were used to construct houses, marae, and the infrastructure required to maintain aspects of Rarotongan culture other than the merely utilitarian.
Overall, this is true of the Rarotongan system, and the degradation of swidden lands in Arorangi when the possibilities of flexibility were greatly reduced, bears this out.
In order to examine, in an archaeological context, a Rarotongan production system wider than just the archaeologically visible repotaro, a model of potential productivity was constructed.
Note: References to evidence from the Rarotongan land court records take the form: Witness, year.