Ras protein


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Related to Ras protein: GTPase, G protein

Ras protein

[¦är¦ā′es ‚prō‚tēn]
(cell and molecular biology)
A GTPase that is part of a signaling cascade that controls cell growth; it turns itself off by hydrolyzing guanosine triphosphate (GTP) to guanosine diphosphate (GDP); however, if left in its active (GTP-bound) form, it can lead to uncontrollable cell growth, or cancer.
References in periodicals archive ?
Stephen Sligar and his team have found that the KRas4b form of Ras protein binds more tightly to the cell membrane, but it needs to attach on the correct side.
This results in Ras protein activity through a combination of GTP through intrinsic activity of GTP-ase comes to the hydrolysis of GTP to GDP.
However, myosin and kinesin 3D structures superpose well with that of ras proteins and are classified as a subgroup within the GTPase family (Leipe et al.
Professionals can then administer monthly boosters of the vaccine to generate an immune response against mutant RAS protein.
The antibody used is a polyclonal anti-ras and recognize all Ras proteins.
In certain types of cancers, such as pancreatic, non-small cell lung and colorectal cancers, the mutation of the Ras protein occurs frequently occurs and causes tumor cell proliferation.
Without the enzyme, the mutant Ras protein can't instruct a cell to embark on a path of explosive growth.
Upon detecting functional similarities between a yeast sex hormone and the yeast form of ras, the researchers, hypothesized that farnesyl provides the missing dab of grease at the tail end of the ras protein.
During their research, the scientists created a synthetic binding protein in the lab, named NS1 monobody and found that it can inhibit the RAS proteins.
Scientists turned to cancer drug selumetinib, which has been designed for other cancers to tackle Ras proteins.
ras proteins transmit mitogenic signals by binding GTP.
Mutations in Ras proteins can result in excessive signals for cells to proliferate and cause them to ignore cues for programmed cell death, leading to unchecked growth and tumor formation.