Raskolnikov


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Raskolnikov

plans and carries out the murder of an old woman pawnbroker. [Russ. Lit.: Crime and Punishment]
See: Murder
References in periodicals archive ?
the murder Raskolnikov becomes feverish and begins behaving
Meetings between Raskolnikov and Porfiry: The Discursive Procedures of Immiscibility and Inter-independence
Such was the impression made on Raskolnikov by the person sitting a little distance from him, who looked like a retired clerk.
As the character John Raskolnikov, in his Dostoevskyian "Crime Journal," writes: "I even resisted the desire to look up certain books in the library" (20).
Gripping as it is to watch a drug baron in a death spiral, or Raskolnikov dragged toward his creator's idea of redemption, the ideal SI would be more like a pen pal living an ordinary life but ready to discuss anything from the mundane to the metaphysical.
33) And Alex Raskolnikov has proposed a "dual enforcement system" in which taxpayers are forced to choose between two regimes, with the objective of allowing the government to better target tax enforcement to taxpayers' diverse motivations for paying or not paying taxes.
As Raskolnikov enters a dangerous cat and mouse game with the magistrate, a psychological thriller unfolds and questions whether any crime can be justified by a higher purpose.
At its heart is Dostoyevsky's sociopathic protagonist, Rodion Raskolnikov, who murders a miserly old pawnbroker and her sister in what one might describe as an intellectual social experiment, a crime he later tries to explain away in a mealy-mouthed excuse as achieving the "greatest happiness for the greatest number" by the idea of redistributing the woman's wealth.
Before them, Adam Best is edgy and troubled as Raskolnikov, the down–and–out former law student who kills his pawnbroker in one spectacularly gory scene, then spends the rest of the show trying to rationalise it.
With nods toward Dostoeusky and Genet (echoing the Lazarus scene between Raskolnikov and Sonya in Crime and Punishment), he experiences a crisis of existential vertigo.
If he has a conscience he will suffer for his mistake," says Raskolnikov in Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment.
Similarly, Alex Raskolnikov relies on the expected value model to