Raskolnikov


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Raskolnikov

plans and carries out the murder of an old woman pawnbroker. [Russ. Lit.: Crime and Punishment]
See: Murder
References in periodicals archive ?
Modeled by his mother-in-law and nephew, Abou Khalil's "Crime and Punishment" shows Raskolnikov seated between the two soon-to-be-murdered women, with an axe on the coffee table by two intricately detailed tea cups.
the murder Raskolnikov becomes feverish and begins behaving
Raskolnikov se desabrocho el abrigo y libero el hacha del nudo, pero sin sacarla del todo, limitandose a sostenerla con la mano derecha debajo de la ropa.
To validate these procedures, we analyze selected dialogues of the meetings between Raskolnikov and Porfiry in Crime and Punishment.
The killers, both child prodigies who graduated from the University of Chicago while in their teens, had absorbed their moral detachment from famous books: Crime and Punishment, where Raskolnikov philosophically justifies his murder of an old woman; Lafcadio's Adventures, the Andre Gide novel that introduced the world to the idea of the acte gratuit, the motiveless crime; above all, the works of Nietzsche, which taught Leopold and Loeb that the superior man, the Abermensch, was not bound by conventional morality.
Based on Fyodor Dostoyevsky's novel, this tells the story of Raskolnikov, a young man who finds himself in such a hopeless situation that he feels that the only way to save himself and his family is to kill a rich and heartless money-lender and take her valuables.
Dostoyevsky's Raskolnikov winds up feeling more shameful about his crime than he had expected.
The passage describes the first encounter of the hero Raskolnikov, a student who decided to commit homicide, with Marmeladov, a drunkard.
As the character John Raskolnikov, in his Dostoevskyian "Crime Journal," writes: "I even resisted the desire to look up certain books in the library" (20).
In Fyodor Dostoevsky's Crime and Punishment, for example, Raskolnikov argues that the truly extraordinary man has "an inner right to decide in his own conscience to overstep ...
Ma'am, ma'am!") Indebted to Miss Magda, a hefty, imperious pawnbroker who wears gaudy print dresses and lives with her daughter in a villa overflowing with hocked booty and festooned with crimson Christmas lights--the film tellingly marks the passage of several Yuletide seasons--Fabian arms himself with a knife, rather than Raskolnikov's ax, to slay the hard-hearted usurer.
Gripping as it is to watch a drug baron in a death spiral, or Raskolnikov dragged toward his creator's idea of redemption, the ideal SI would be more like a pen pal living an ordinary life but ready to discuss anything from the mundane to the metaphysical.