Legal Authority

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Legal Authority

 

the ability of a participant in a legal relation to take certain actions or demand certain actions of another participant in this legal relation; this capability is provided for in the law. Legal authority is guaranteed by the state; if some person fails to perform obligations, a party with legal authority may appeal to a court, arbitration tribunal, or other state agency for protection of his right.

References in periodicals archive ?
"The Politics of Expertise" draws on insights from sociology, political science, and institutional theory; as well as sends challenges theories centered on particular actors' authority, whether it is the authority of so-called epistemic communities, the moral authority of advocacy groups, or the rational-legal authority of international organizations.
While it is true that we have elements and examples of many different kinds of leadership in Jewish history and culture, from the traditional inherited authority of the Kings of Israel down to the current Hasidic dynasties, and from the charismatic leadership styles of Abraham down to (in the last generation, for instance) the dynamism of the late Lubavitcher Rebbe, one of the interesting facts that distinguishes Judaism as a religion is our preference for, and reliance on, the third type of leader, the rational-legal authority; the jurisprude.
from a modified form of rational-legal authority which John Boli and
make specific reference to the rational-legal authority embodied by the
This diffusion of Weberian rational-legal authority, predicted by a "world polity" approach, has enhanced the role of international law and organizations in defining state interests vis-a-vis the use of force.
Rational-legal authority: a bureaucracy, within which authority is both legal and rational because it is exercised through a system of rules and procedures attached to the `office'--the job role--which an individual occupies.
Drawing on long-standing Weberian arguments about bureaucracy and sociological institutionalist approaches to organizational behavior, we argue that the rational-legal authority that IOs embody gives them power independent of the states that created them and channels that power in particular directions.
Traditional authority and rational-legal authority involve rules, and rules simultaneously have empowering and constraining effects.
He reflects that the Weberian spirit makes the manager a rational-legal authority, "which legitimates stratification and hierarchy in organizations by recourse to the functionality of the expert" (p.
The parent organization's governance rests on its rational-legal authority resulting from its being a legally incorporated 501(c)3 nonprofit organization.
Little is known about the relationship between the social model program's experiential authority, derived from its AA-based philosophy, and the rational-legal authority resulting from its incorporation as a nonprofit organization.
Rational-legal authority rests on the "belief in the 'legality' of patterns of normative rules and the right of those elevated to authority under such rules to issue commands" (Weber, 1947: 329).