Ravensbrueck

Ravensbrueck

women’s concentration camp in Germany. [Ger. Hist.: Shirer, 1275]
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Poland's first lady, Anna Komorowska, joined remembrance activities at the site of the Ravensbrueck women's camp.
More than 130,000 women were imprisoned in Ravensbrueck and 20,000 to 30,000 died there.
Large color pictures show drawings and sculptures made by inmates of Auschwitz and of the Buchenwald and Ravensbrueck German Nazi concentration camps.
Some other items are a wooden figurine and a metal bracelet with scenes from Auschwitz, found near a crematorium at Birkenau, shortly after it was liberated by the Soviet army in January 1945, and a Catholic crucifix from women's camp of Ravensbrueck.
Gertrud Mueller, of a survivor's group from the notorious Nazi female concentration camp of Ravensbrueck, said: "I pleaded with the authorities not to give this monster a penny and now they reward him for murder."
The first transport, composed of 999 Jewish women from Poprad, Slovakia, reached Auschwitz in late March 1942 and was followed later that day by another group of 999 German women from Ravensbrueck. Eventually, the growing female population of Auschwitz was transferred to the newly-opened nearby Auschwitz II camp, also known as Birkenau.
Wallisch was a camp warden in Nazi Germany's Ravensbrueck concentration camp, north of Berlin, and at Majdanek in 1942-1944, and settled in Austria soon after the end of the war.
Speaking to Deutsche Presse-Agentur, Paul said the women were largely recruited from the women's concentration camp Ravensbrueck to the north of Berlin.