Ray Tomlinson


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Ray Tomlinson

(person)
An engineer at Bolt Beranek and Newman who, in July 1972 while designing the firstelectronic mail} program, chose the commercial at symbol "@" to separate the user name from the computer name.
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Ray Tomlinson, a principal engineer with Raytheon BBN Technologies who sent the first network email in 1971 and saved the "@" symbol from probable extinction, was honored last year with the first inductees into the Hall of Fame.
When Ray Tomlinson invented emails in 1971, he explains that the first messages, sent to himself as a test, were just nonsense; "Most likely QWERTYUIOP, or something similar," he says.
Could social media now take over what once took the world by storm when programmer Ray Tomlinson sent the first message across a network in 1971?
Email was adapted for ARPANET by Ray Tomlinson of BBN in 1972.
lt;strong>Late 1971: </strong>The first emails are sent over the ARPANET network, by Ray Tomlinson - who would also propose the @ sign as being a crucial part of email addresses.
A THE first was sent in 1972 by Ray Tomlinson an American engineer, who was working on a project to transfer files between computers.
Engineer Ray Tomlinson sent the first email message between two computers in 1972.
Ray Tomlinson, president of Crowne Consulting Group Inc.
The first e-mail was sent in 1971 by Ray Tomlinson of ARPANET (Advanced Research Projects Agency Network).
The States, and indeed the world, is very lucky that Ray Tomlinson (no relation) invented e-mail before someone evil enough to put anthrax in a letter was born.
Scientist Ray Tomlinson was tinkering with an internal electronic messaging system when he discovered a way of sending notes between computers.