Rayleigh-Taylor instability


Also found in: Wikipedia.

Rayleigh-Taylor instability

[¦rā·lē ′tā·lər ‚in·stə′bil·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The instability of the interface separating two fluids having different densities when the lighter fluid is accelerated toward the heavier fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
Reynolds Number Effects on Rayleigh-Taylor Instability with Possible Implications for Type-1a Supernovae.
The team noticed in NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) high-resolution images that the falling plasma clearly underwent the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as it returned to the Sun's surface.
Fingers of the vinegar previously below the lower-density oil begin to fall through the oil in a pattern known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.
The so-called Rayleigh-Taylor instability that occurs whenever the more buoyant of two fluids lies below the other then amplifies these ripples, rapidly draining the cup.
Experimental research into the explosive plasma currents, subjected to the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is described in detail.
The experiment described here is an unstable density distribution and, although it does not exactly correspond to a Rayleigh-Taylor case, one may still use similar experiments of the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as a guide (Sharp, 1984; Redondo & Linden, 1990, 1991; Linden et al.
In general, the mixing efficiency values are small if we compare them with the efficiency of a Rayleigh-Taylor instability --although the global evolution is right-.
Although poorly understood, that type of breakdown, known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is a major feature of many physical systems, ranging from dripping paint to supernovas, Wesfreid notes.
Called the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, this heavily studied type of breakdown occurs in such diverse settings as seawater mixing, supernova explosions, and laser-driven nuclear fusion.
By examining both gravity and heat, the Texas study "enables us to understand how two important things work together" to affect the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, says Leo P.
The other mechanism, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, kicks in when a bubble is at its smallest.
Such a pattern, in the argot of fluid dynamics, is known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.