Rayleigh-Taylor instability


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Rayleigh-Taylor instability

[¦rā·lē ′tā·lər ‚in·stə′bil·əd·ē]
(fluid mechanics)
The instability of the interface separating two fluids having different densities when the lighter fluid is accelerated toward the heavier fluid.
References in periodicals archive ?
The team noticed in NASA Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) high-resolution images that the falling plasma clearly underwent the Rayleigh-Taylor instability as it returned to the Sun's surface.
Fingers of the vinegar previously below the lower-density oil begin to fall through the oil in a pattern known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.
Experimental research into the explosive plasma currents, subjected to the effect of Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is described in detail.
Although poorly understood, that type of breakdown, known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, is a major feature of many physical systems, ranging from dripping paint to supernovas, Wesfreid notes.
Called the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, this heavily studied type of breakdown occurs in such diverse settings as seawater mixing, supernova explosions, and laser-driven nuclear fusion.
By examining both gravity and heat, the Texas study "enables us to understand how two important things work together" to affect the Rayleigh-Taylor instability, says Leo P.
The other mechanism, Rayleigh-Taylor instability, kicks in when a bubble is at its smallest.
The slow parametric oscillations (jagged line) give the bubble some time to adjust its size before it hits the Rayleigh-Taylor instability region (solid line).
Such a pattern, in the argot of fluid dynamics, is known as the Rayleigh-Taylor instability.