rebellion

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rebellion

organized resistance or opposition to a government or other authority
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

rebellion

successful or unsuccessful mass uprisings against an existing set of rules, usually distinguished from REVOLUTION in that the system of power and authority is not fundamentally questioned, and also distinguished from COUPS D’ETAT in that the latter involve political ‘insiders’ rather than mass movements. Rebellions were a characteristic form of dynastic change in preindustrial empires. Glucksmann (1963) also sees these as endemic in traditional African states. Among typical groups involved in rebellions are slaves, peasants, and millenarian sects. The reason why rebellions rarely lead to revolutions is that forms of political organization based on CLASS and genuine structural alternatives in political and economic organization are both usually lacking before the advent of INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES.
Collins Dictionary of Sociology, 3rd ed. © HarperCollins Publishers 2000

Rebellion

Absalom
conspires to overthrow father, David. [O.T.: II Samuel 15:10–18:33]
Bastille Day
celebration of day Paris mob stormed prison; first outbreak of French Revolution (1789). [Fr. Hist.: EB, I: 866]
Beer Hall Putsch
early, aborted Nazi coup (1923). [Ger. Hist.: Hitler, 198–241]
Boston Tea Party
irate colonists, dressed as Indians, pillage three British ships (1773). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 58, 495]
Boxer Rebellion
xenophobic Chinese Taoist faction rebelled against foreign intruders (1900). [Chinese Hist.: Parrinder, 50]
Caine Mutiny, The
sailors seize command from the pathological and incompetent Capt. Queeg. [Am. Lit.: Wouk The Caine Mutiny in Benét, 157]
Christian, Fletcher
(fl. late 18th century) leader of mutinous sailors against Captain Bligh (1789). [Am. Lit.: Mutiny on the Bounty]
Easter Rising
unsuccessful Irish revolt against British (1916). [Irish Hist.: EB, III: 760–761]
Gunpowder Plot
Guy Fawkes’s aborted plan to blow up British House of Commons (1605). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 1165]
Harpers Ferry
scene of Brown’s aborted slave uprising. [Am. Hist.: John Jameson, 220]
Hungarian Revolt
iron-curtain country futilely resisted Soviet domination (1956). [Eur. Hist.: Van Doren, 553]
Jacquerie French
peasant revolt, brutally carried out and suppressed (1358). [Fr. Hist.: Bishop, 372–373]
Jeroboam
with God’s sanction, establishes hegemony over ten tribes of Israel. [O.T.: I Kings 11:31–35]
Korah
rose up against Moses; slain by Jehovah. [O.T.: Numbers 16:1–3]
Kralich, Ivan
fugitive from Turkish law; firebrand for Bulgarian independence of Ottoman rule. [Bulgarian Lit.: Under the Yoke]
Mutiny on the Bounty
activities of mutineers, Captain Bligh, island wanderings (1789). [Am. Lit.: Mutiny on the Bounty]
Peasants’ Revolt,
the English villeins’ attempt to improve their lot (1381). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 220–221, 373–374]
Pilot,
the Mr. Gray successfully carries out many assignments for the rebels and thwarts the British [Am. Lit.: Cooper The Pilot]
Sepoy Rebellion Indian
soldiers’ uprising against British rule in India (1857–1858). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 1328]
Sheba
led an aborted revolt against King David. [O.T.: II Samuel 20: 1–2]
Spina, Pietro
returns from exile disguised as a priest and engages in antifascist activities. [Ital. Lit.: Bread and Wine]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Military rebellions have become increasingly common in army camps, Hizam said.
Seth Richardson ("The Fields of Rebellion and Periphery") begins the discussion with an introductory section concerning rebellion as "process" (i.e., giving attention to the "features and dynamics common to 'rebellions' not dependent on the context of modernity," p.
The 1549 Rebellions and the Making of Early Modern England is divided into three parts: context, political language, and consequences.
In recent decades, the intersection of religion and resistance in colonial Southeast Asia has received considerable attention by scholars and has subsequently endured as a dominant paradigm in the study of anti-colonial protest movements.' Such research has produced important insight into the nature of rebellion and protest, often focusing on how religion provided the language and vocabulary through which nationalism, colonialism and resistance were articulated.
REBELLION will be at the heart of concerts by musicians devoted to the works of an 18th Century Newcastle composer.
The Taiping Heavenly Kingdom: Rebellion and the Blasphemy of Empire, by Thomas H.
Unlike the other Andean rebellions of the 1780s, the Tomas Katari revolt mainly resulted in attacks here and there, not massive warfare.
This led many to wonder if profit-seeking merchants had unwittingly sown seeds for another rebellion. After 1739, three events added to this anxiety.
It outstrips the rebellion last November by 62 Labour MPs on foundation hospitals when the Government's majority was cut to just 17.
To come to fruition, these individual efforts awaited the political climate of the late 1960s -- and James Cone's first book, Block Theology and Black Power (1969), which he wrote as a young college professor a few miles from Detroit's Rebellion. In this groundbreaking tex t, Cone defined the compatibility of the Seemingly incongruous concepts of Black Power and Christianity, drawing from histories by oppressed people in the United States, and divorcing the concept of Christian love from any form of submission to oppression.
In 1786, three years after the treaty of peace was signed, there was a rebellion of farmers in western Massachusetts, led by Captain Daniel Shays, a veteran of the war.
Michael Bane, following music historian Miles Fischer, points out in White Boy Singin' the Blues that African Americans never really interpreted the Christian concept of heaven as otherworldly until after the failed rebellions of people like slave leader Nat Turner (circa 1830s).