rebellion

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rebellion

organized resistance or opposition to a government or other authority

rebellion

successful or unsuccessful mass uprisings against an existing set of rules, usually distinguished from REVOLUTION in that the system of power and authority is not fundamentally questioned, and also distinguished from COUPS D’ETAT in that the latter involve political ‘insiders’ rather than mass movements. Rebellions were a characteristic form of dynastic change in preindustrial empires. Glucksmann (1963) also sees these as endemic in traditional African states. Among typical groups involved in rebellions are slaves, peasants, and millenarian sects. The reason why rebellions rarely lead to revolutions is that forms of political organization based on CLASS and genuine structural alternatives in political and economic organization are both usually lacking before the advent of INDUSTRIAL SOCIETIES.

Rebellion

Absalom
conspires to overthrow father, David. [O.T.: II Samuel 15:10–18:33]
Bastille Day
celebration of day Paris mob stormed prison; first outbreak of French Revolution (1789). [Fr. Hist.: EB, I: 866]
Beer Hall Putsch
early, aborted Nazi coup (1923). [Ger. Hist.: Hitler, 198–241]
Boston Tea Party
irate colonists, dressed as Indians, pillage three British ships (1773). [Am. Hist.: Jameson, 58, 495]
Boxer Rebellion
xenophobic Chinese Taoist faction rebelled against foreign intruders (1900). [Chinese Hist.: Parrinder, 50]
Caine Mutiny, The
sailors seize command from the pathological and incompetent Capt. Queeg. [Am. Lit.: Wouk The Caine Mutiny in Benét, 157]
Christian, Fletcher
(fl. late 18th century) leader of mutinous sailors against Captain Bligh (1789). [Am. Lit.: Mutiny on the Bounty]
Easter Rising
unsuccessful Irish revolt against British (1916). [Irish Hist.: EB, III: 760–761]
Gunpowder Plot
Guy Fawkes’s aborted plan to blow up British House of Commons (1605). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 1165]
Harpers Ferry
scene of Brown’s aborted slave uprising. [Am. Hist.: John Jameson, 220]
Hungarian Revolt
iron-curtain country futilely resisted Soviet domination (1956). [Eur. Hist.: Van Doren, 553]
Jacquerie French
peasant revolt, brutally carried out and suppressed (1358). [Fr. Hist.: Bishop, 372–373]
Jeroboam
with God’s sanction, establishes hegemony over ten tribes of Israel. [O.T.: I Kings 11:31–35]
Korah
rose up against Moses; slain by Jehovah. [O.T.: Numbers 16:1–3]
Kralich, Ivan
fugitive from Turkish law; firebrand for Bulgarian independence of Ottoman rule. [Bulgarian Lit.: Under the Yoke]
Mutiny on the Bounty
activities of mutineers, Captain Bligh, island wanderings (1789). [Am. Lit.: Mutiny on the Bounty]
Peasants’ Revolt,
the English villeins’ attempt to improve their lot (1381). [Br. Hist.: Bishop, 220–221, 373–374]
Pilot,
the Mr. Gray successfully carries out many assignments for the rebels and thwarts the British [Am. Lit.: Cooper The Pilot]
Sepoy Rebellion Indian
soldiers’ uprising against British rule in India (1857–1858). [Br. Hist.: NCE, 1328]
Sheba
led an aborted revolt against King David. [O.T.: II Samuel 20: 1–2]
Spina, Pietro
returns from exile disguised as a priest and engages in antifascist activities. [Ital. Lit.: Bread and Wine]
References in periodicals archive ?
Eamon Darcy's book concentrates not on a narrative of the rebellion, but on the portrayal of that rebellion in newsbooks and in other documentary evidence, most notably the depositions created in its wake.
Military rebellions have become increasingly common in army camps, Hizam said.
Rebellions per se are routinely reported as failures.
The 1549 Rebellions and the Making of Early Modern England is divided into three parts: context, political language, and consequences.
One particular consequence of examining the rebellion within a general 'Burmese' nationalist interpretation and specifically within a religious-nationalist strain was that rebellions in Burma since 1885 were beginning to be seen as typically restorative in nature in that Burmese sought to reinstate pre-colonial institutions as opposed to replacing them with western institutions.
REBELLION will be at the heart of concerts by musicians devoted to the works of an 18th Century Newcastle composer.
The paradox is explained by the widespread discontent of the people, resulting from the rising tax burden occasioned by rebellions in other parts of China.
Rather than focusing on the period just prior to the rebellions, the author quite rightfully picks up the story in the 1740s, when a short-lived spate of Andean peasant rebellions prefigured the later, much more massive ones.
On 6 April, convinced that a slave rebellion was underway, the New York Supreme Court launched an investigation.
However the biggest rebellions have by far and away been over the Iraq war, culminating in March when 138 MPs, plus one teller, opposed the Government.
The Los Angeles race rebellions sear images into my consciousness of African Americans claiming authentic citizenship, in the midst of their own oppressions.
The state would use its power to drive out foreign competitors, to put down rebellions at home and abroad.