recession

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recession:

see depressiondepression,
in economics, period of economic crisis in commerce, finance, and industry, characterized by falling prices, restriction of credit, low output and investment, numerous bankruptcies, and a high level of unemployment.
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recession

a period of lower than average economic growth.

recession

[ri′sesh·ən]
(geology)
The backward movement, or retreat, of an eroded escarpment.
A continuing landward movement of a shoreline or beach undergoing erosion. Also known as retrogression.
The withdrawal of a body of water (as a sea or lake), thereby exposing formerly submerged areas.
(hydrology)
The gradual upstream retreat of a waterfall.

recession

1. Economics a temporary depression in economic activity or prosperity
2. Religion the withdrawal of the clergy and choir in procession from the chancel at the conclusion of a church service
References in periodicals archive ?
First, while the National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) Business Cycle Dating Committee identifies national recessions, neither it nor any other comparable organization dates state-level recessions.
As the 1980 recession was the shortest and shallowest national recession since 1979, its characteristics were used as the minimum criteria for determining state recessions: a minimum duration of four months and a minimum decline equal to or exceeding a simple variance measure computed for each state.
3, as a traditional recession and not a double-dip recession.
While these numbers are extraordinary in magnitude, placing the Great Recession in the uppermost corner of the chart, they are generally in line with the relationship between GDP and employment during previous recessions.
4% for the year, not quite a profits recession but mighty close to one, and he gives just 10%-15% odds of an economic recession.
Raise your hand if you think the United States will never have another recession.
Ball finds that the recent recessions have had dire effects on economies' productive capacity, as measured by OECD and IMF estimates of potential output.
In this study, we investigate whether the Great Recession is associated with variation in annual health care expenditures at the lower (e.
More particularly, we allow for both slope and level changes by introducing the recession dummies in the mean and interaction terms with the output variable; these account for the average variability of Okun's law during recessions relative to "normal" times.
A recession is a period of at least two quarters of GDP contraction which usually involves job losses, reduced corporate profits and lower government revenue.
The 2008 Great Recession, however, have left non-farm payrolls below 96 percent of the pre-recession level after 37 months since the recession first began.
In this paper, I am proposing a new, detailed, multistep method for forecasting recessions in which some of the steps are drawn from the literature and others are new.