Rechabites


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Rechabites

(rē`kəbīts), in the Bible, a family that practiced asceticism. Organized by Jonadab, who helped Jehu purge Israel of the Baal cult, they drank no wine, built no houses, sowed no seed, planted no vines, and lived in tents. The Rechabites were apparently related to the Kenites.

Rechabites

pastoral people who abstained from all wines. [O.T.: Jeremiah 35:5–19]
References in periodicals archive ?
The Jews of Arabia and the Rechabites. Jewish Quarterly Review n.s.
The Crystal Fount and Rechabite Recorder reprinted "The Death of Wind-Foot: An Indian Story" without change from American Review text.
This one is captioned "Independent Order of Rechabites. High movable conference.
Which is why, in 1837, the longest-lasting temperance organisation of all took his name and called them selves Rechabites. Small Cardiff kids enrolled in this outfit swore to lead blameless teetotal lives and you'd hear tots trilling that "My drink is water bright, water bright, water bright, my drink is water bright, from the crystal stream."
John's world was not innocent of fiction, even of religious fiction, such as Tobit and The History of the Rechabites. Our Bibles contain the Revelation of St John (presumably another John), which is so full of symbolism that most of us don't really know what it means.
Why, for example, is the History of the Rechabites (also known as The Story of Zosimus) not mentioned in chapter 2?
So several societies - like the Band Of Hope, Rechabites and The Good Templars - sprang up, trying to persuade people to 'Take The Pledge' and abstain from alcohol.
42.3), while various traditions about the mysterious tee-totalling Rechabites of Jeremiah 35 appear to have been popular in the Tannaitic period.(56) Abstention from wine and meat mark Reuben's repentance in T.
The Independent Order of Good Templars included tobacco in its pledge for juvenile members in Australia,(14) while the Rechabites, another temperance lodge, campaigned for juvenile smoking legislation after 1900.
They were competing for members and sought to offer the best possible terms: the Rechabites, for example, urged that medical benefit be extended to dependants, and the National Association of Trade Union Approved Societies proposed that all societies should pool their assets to create a comprehensive medical service.
For a recent study of this work see Chris Knights, '"The Story of Zosimus" or "The History of the Rechabites"?', Jnl for the Study of Judaism 24 (1993), 235-245.