Rectrices


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Related to Rectrices: Remige, Retrice

Rectrices

 

in birds, the feathers of the tail used during flight. The tail increases the area providing lift and serves as a “rudder” when the bird changes direction. The rectrices are attached symmetrically to the pygostyle (the terminal bone in the tail). They vary in number from four pairs (American ani) to 12 pairs (pelicans, some pheasants).

Rectrices are similar in structure to flight feathers and, like them, overlap one another. The base of the rectrices is covered by the upper and lower coverts. The shape of the tail is determined by the length of the rectrices. In woodpeckers and tree creepers the rectrices are narrow and rigid, serving as a support when the birds climb. The rectrices of peacocks are concealed under powerfully developed upper tail coverts with ocellated spots. Some penguins, storks, and grebes have underdeveloped rectrices.

References in periodicals archive ?
Rectrices vary in number (12 in the pigeon and 18 in the turkey, Meleagris gallopavo, for example), but their relationship to the caudal vertebrae and musculature is quite consistent across species.
The rectrices form a flight surface that is tightly coupled with the wings during aerial locomotion (Gatesy and Dial 1993, 1996).
Allen (1962) first described what is now known as the bulbi rectricium and proposed that it fans the rectrices "by pulling tips of calami closer together" (1962, p.
lateralis caudae with an improved line of action so that its contraction can contribute to spreading of the rectrices by abduction of the outermost rectrix.
Feathers were removed from the back and tail region; the rectrices and major coverts remained intact.
Lift was calculated for a pigeon tail with 14-cm long rectrices operating at a range of speeds (5-10 m/sec), angles of attack (0 [degrees]-25 [degrees]) and fan angles (0 [degrees]-180 [degrees]) using the lift equation in Thomas (1993).
In contrast, stimulation of the pigeon bulbi rectricium rapidly spreads the rectrices up to approximately 90 [degrees] (ca.
If the pulse train is terminated, however, the rectrices are quickly adducted.
Birds would often elevate and abduct the rectrices upon landing to help balance on the perch.
of New Guinea have 16 rectrices and the Pheasant Pigeons (Otidiphaps nobilis) possess 20 or 22 (Glenny & Amadon 1955) and are thus reminiscent of Darwin's Java Fantails.
La cola es negruzca y las rectrices exteriores ampliamente punteadas de blanco.
Presenta una coloracion general verde, aunque mas palido en las regiones inferiores; color azul claro alrededor de los ojos; lados de la coronilla azul palido; amarilla en el centro de la coronilla, mejillas y en algunas aves, en la garganta; nuca y cuello posterior con tinte azul hacia el borde de las plumas, las cuales estan orladas de negro; espejo alar y borde del ala anaranjados y el resto de la superficie inferior del ala, verde con tinte azuloso; parte de las rectrices con una extensa mancha anaranjada y una banda que va de verde a negruzca.