recurrent nova


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recurrent nova

(ri-ku -rĕnt, -ker -ĕnt) A cataclysmic variable that suffers a series of violent nova?-like outbursts at periodic intervals. The change in brightness is smaller and the decline in brightness more pronounced than with classical novae. Like other cataclysmic variables, a recurrent nova is a close binary system in which one member is a white dwarf; the other component is a red giant, and gas is being transferred from the latter to the former. The red giant loses matter about a thousand times faster than the companion in a nova system, so that the transferred hydrogen builds up on the surface of the white dwarf at a much quicker rate. The accumulated hydrogen is hence sufficient to erupt in a thermonuclear explosion after only a few decades, and astronomers have been able to see multiple outbursts within the past century or so of systematic investigation of variable stars. Between outbursts, the system's light comprises both emission from hot gas circling the white dwarf and light from the cool red giant; as a result the spectrum shows what is apparently a star with two different temperatures (as with a symbiotic star). T Pyxidis (1890, 1902, 1920, 1944, 1965), RS Ophiuchi (1901, 1933, 1958, 1967, 1985), T Coronae Borealis (1866, 1946), U Scorpii (1863, 1906, 1936, 1979, 1987), and V394 Coronae Australis (1949, 1987) are recurrent novae.

recurrent nova

[ri′kər·ənt ′nō·və]
(astronomy)
A binary star that undergoes outbursts every few decades in which the brightness increases roughly 100-1000 times, as the result of nuclear explosions in matter that has accreted on a white dwarf component star from a neighboring red giant component.
References in periodicals archive ?
The 1985 eruption of the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi was the first to be followed over the entire electromagnetic spectrum, affording the opportunity to investigate the complex interaction between the material rejected in the nova explosion and the red giant wind.
In a recurrent nova, it takes only a few decades for the pressure and temperature at the base of the accumulated layer to become sufficiently high for hydrogen to begin fusing into helium.
We are grateful that we can depend on amateur astronomers to detect the next outburst as we continue to wrestle with the wealth of data from the 2006 outburst and prepare for the next major outburst of RS Oph or another bright recurrent nova.
orb] Spectral d type of secondary V1017 Sgr Recurrent nova 5.
Since the white dwarf appears very near the limit, it must be possible for a white dwarf in a recurrent nova to accumulate mass from one eruption to another," says Sokoloski.
This famous 11th-magnitude recurrent nova, in eastern Ophiuchus near Serpens Cauda, had erupted into naked-eye visibility in 1898, 1933, 1958, 1967, and 1985, and Wallerstein noted that its next eruption might occur at any time.
T Pyxidis is a recurrent nova that's been caught in outburst five times, starting in 1890.
A recurrent nova ui getting way overdue for its next explosion.
Eight years later, on January 30, 1985, Alcock caught an outburst from the recurrent nova RS Ophiuchi.
If you ever see a conspicuous naked-eye star just southeast of the Corona cup, you will probably be witnessing the fourth known outburst of the amazing recurrent nova T Coronae Borealis, nicknamed the Blaze Star.
Among these stars are many eclipsing binaries, Cepheid variables, and semiregular red variables, as well as a few long-period stars of the Mira type and the recurrent nova T Coronae Borealis.
Returns of Comet Halley and the outbursts from recurrent nova T Coronae Borealis every 80-odd years aren't random incidents over time scales spanning their respective periods In addition, last year's 21 Jovian impacts of Comet Shoemaker-Levy 9 were not random events, for the pieces had all broken off previously from a common parent.

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