recusant

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recusant

1. (in 16th to 18th century England) a Roman Catholic who did not attend the services of the Church of England, as was required by law
2. (formerly, of Catholics) refusing to attend services of the Church of England
References in periodicals archive ?
Table 1 is based on the records found in NRQSM 2/2 fos 198v-202v; the names of hosts known to be Catholic recusants or Catholic sympathisers are shown in bold.
The recusant polyglot Elizabeth Jane Watson made Bohemia her home, as did, for a shorter period, her stepfather, Edward Kelley, and his associate, Dr.
Did Shakespeare purchase New Place in Stratford to assist its bankrupted recusant owners, or was it simply an opportunist investment?
Depending on the strenuousness of one's belief in Catholic doctrine, conforming to the standards of the English Church was heretical, as recusants maintained, because it necessarily entailed denial of the pope's authority.
The jacket blurb tells us that Jessie Childs' next book will be on the Catholic recusants.
If John Shakespeare was a man of such strong traditional faith that he would resist the pressure of the Elizabethan regime against recusants, his faith was likely to have had an impact on son William as well.
Fawkes was a staunch Catholic and a member of the Recusants, the group which formed most of the plotters.
5, a book mainly of religious songs for communal use assembled in the 1650s and known to have been amongst the recusants of Wootton Wawen in Warwickshire.
He persuasively argues (contrary to conventional wisdom about the inefficiency of early modern government) that the state could and did make recusants conform to the Church of England.
Bateson (whom she does not mention) contended that the polemical literature from the Catholic exiles and recusants, in its liveliness and wit, greatly influenced the characteristic English literary (and especially dramatic) style, and Harvey, Nashe, and Greene acknowledged as much.
In their latest work, they take Clitherow and situate her in a broader context of not only recusancy in the north of England, but of widespread arguments within the Catholic community in Elizabethan England about how recusants could respond to demands of obedience from the state and the strikingly divergent conclusions Catholic clergy reached about reconciling their faith with the state.