red flag

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red flag

a symbol of socialism, communism, or revolution

red flag

symbol of peril. [Folklore: Jobes, 413]
See: Danger
References in periodicals archive ?
Cahill's guide cuts to the chase by pointing out seventeen potential "Condo Red Flags.
Fighting Fraud with the Red Flags Rule: A How-To Guide for Business
The Red Flags rule requires businesses and organizations that handle consumers' personal data to create written plans and policies to prevent and detect consumer identity theft.
Regardless of the lawsuit's outcome, the latest enforcement extension means that even though the red flags rule technically is in effect now, enforcement will be postponed for physicians and other covered businesses until at least January 1, 2011.
Red flag II; a guide to solving serious pathology of the spine.
3763) that would exempt physician practices with 20 or fewer employees--as well as small accounting and legal practices--from the Red Flags Rule.
In August, the ABA filed a three-count suit in the federal district court for the District of Columbia seeking an injunction to block the FTC's application of the Red Flags Rule to lawyers.
1 as the date when it would start enforcing the red flags rule, so if a business to which the rule applies failed to have a contingency plan in place after that date and sustained a loss of customer identifying data, there may not be hell to pay, but $3,500 per violation.
The program also addresses employee protection, raising red flags before a work condition leads to a litigious situation.
Millions of dollars of an organization's fraud losses could be saved by training employees to recognize the common fraudster characteristics and red flags.
In early December 2010, a broad range of unsuspecting companies was required to comply with the Federal Trade Commission's so-called red flags rule and create an identity theft prevention program.
Beginning December 31, the Red Flags Rule, which will be enforced by the FTC, the National Credit Union Administration and a host of other federal bank regulators, will require all organizations subject to the Fair and Accurate Credit Transactions Act of 2003 to implement a formal identity theft prevention program.