Red Queen

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Red Queen

shaken by Alice, she turns into a kitten. [Br. Lit.: Lewis Carroll Through the Looking-Glass]
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The study was designed to test a popular evolutionary theory called the Red Queen hypothesis, named after Lewis Carroll's character who in "Through the Looking Glass" described her country as a place where "it takes all the running you can do, to keep in the same place.
For example, in the Red Queen Hypothesis a population of genetic clones would be unable to escape a parasite, leaving the host organism unable to evolve and adapt.
A report in Science affirms this Red Queen hypothesis, an evolutionary theory whose name comes from a character in Lewis Carroll's Alice in Wonderland, who says: "It takes all the running you can do to keep in the same place.
In this study, black spot parasites of the Phoxinus eos-neogaeus gynogenetic cyprinid complex, in Voyageurs National Park, were used to re-test the Red Queen Hypothesis, which suggest that sexual fish have an advantage over clonal fish regarding parasite loads.
The Red Queen hypothesis, for instance, finds the main benefit of sex in shuffling the genome quickly, making it difficult for parasites to lock onto weaknesses.
Of the many hypotheses suggested for the evolutionary maintenance of sex (reviews in Bell 1982; Kondrashov 1993), two seem to dominate the present literature: the mutational accumulation hypothesis, and the Red Queen hypothesis.
At first glance, the Red Queen Hypothesis would seem to have direct applicability to the American food distribution industry.
Among crop plants there is evidence for Flor's (1956) gene-for-gene model, but under the Red Queen hypothesis a "matching-allele" model is assumed (Hamilton 1980, Frank 1993).
The Red Queen Hypothesis predicts that sex should allow hosts to evade infection from their parasites, whereas self-fertilisation may increase the risk of infection," co-author Curtis Lively said.
A third issue is related to the Red Queen hypothesis (van Valen 1973).
He called it the Red Queen hypothesis, after the character in Lewis Carroll's Through the Looking Glass who must run simply to stay in place.
The Red Queen Hypothesis challenged this by pointing out that actually most natural selection will arise from co-evolutionary interactions with other species, not from interactions with the environment.