red dwarf

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red dwarf

Any of a large group of main-sequence stars, mainly M and K stars, that are much cooler, smaller, and less massive than the Sun (about 0.1–0.7 MO ). The convective motion within these stars, in combination with their rotation, generates a magnetic field, and the stars display a range of magnetically initiated phenomena similar to and sometimes more energetic than those occurring on the Sun. These include starspots, flares, and hot chromospheres and coronae. See also flare stars; dwarf star.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
References in periodicals archive ?
Slightly closer to home, at least in our own galaxy, another study also published in Nature looks at a single red dwarf star in a way that is a step forward in astronomers' search for life beyond Earth.
Objects in space that have just a little more mass than brown dwarfs are called red dwarf stars. Red dwarfs may not be much larger than brown dwarfs, but that small increase in size makes a big difference.
Red Dwarf star Hattie Hayridge is the main attraction.
One of the 15 newly discovered planets was found orbiting one of the brightest red dwarf stars, called K2-155, located about 200 light years away from Earth.
(http://www.ibtimes.com/can-planets-near-red-dwarf-stars-support-life-nasa-says-dont-bet-it-2548417) Red dwarf stars give off less energy than other stars do so they might not emit enough energy to keep planets in the traditional habitable zone warm enough.
Red dwarf stars are smaller, cooler, and fainter than our Sun.
Read: (http://www.ibtimes.com/can-planets-near-red-dwarf-stars-support-life-nasa-says-dont-bet-it-2548417) Can Planets Near Red Dwarf Stars Support Life?
Two Princeton researchers recently contemplated that we really might be alone in the universe, but the study of red dwarf stars in the Milky Way discovered nine super-Earths - and two in the 'habitable zone' where liquid water could exist.
The PHL pointed the telescope toward Ross 128 while observing a whole group of red dwarf stars - smaller, cooler and less luminous than our sun.
This first direct estimate of the number of light planets around red dwarf stars has just been announced by an international team using observations with the HARPS spectrograph on the 3.6-meter telescope at ESO's La Silla Observatory in Chile.
A radio telescope at the Arecibo Observatory in Puerto Rico picked them up on May 12 while checking out red dwarf stars that have planets orbiting them, as part of a project to learn more about the "radiation and magnetic environments around the stars or even hint the presence of new sub-stellar objects, including planets."