Red-Hardness

red-hardness

[′red ¦härd·nəs]
(metallurgy)
In reference to high-speed steel and other cutting tool materials, the property of being hard enough to cut metals even when heated to a dull-red color.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Red-Hardness

 

(also called heat resistance), the ability of steel, upon heating to red heat, to retain the great hardness and durability obtained through heat treatment. A high level of red-hardness is characteristic of tool steel. Red-hardness is achieved by alloying steel with tungsten, molybdenum, vanadium, and chromium, as well as by high-temperature hardening. Red-hardness is defined as the maximum temperature at which steel retains a given hardness. For example, high-speed steel retains Rockwell C hardness of up to 60 at 620°-650°C. Hard alloys have the highest level of red-hardness (up to 900°C).

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
Additional properties, such as red-hardness, are needed.
* The tool will get so hot in service the steel will lose its temper, i.e., more red-hardness is needed.
Another application might require maximum red-hardness and wear resistance.