Reddish-Brown soil

Reddish-Brown soil

[′red·ish ¦brau̇n ′sȯil]
(geology)
A group of zonal soils having a reddish, light brown surface horizon overlying a heavier, more reddish horizon and a light-colored lime horizon.
References in periodicals archive ?
On a plot that just last week was occupied by parasol pine trees, excavators Wednesday afternoon dumped reddish-brown soil from a depth of more than four meters into a long line of waiting trucks while workers flattened the earth with shovels.
Early on, a family friend, a Bordeaux geologist, identified an unusually high mineral content in the reddish-brown soils and, over dinner, remarked: "You have the potential to make grand cru Wine." So rich, in fact, that the Canadian authorities once believed the wine was adulterated with gold, as traces of the element were subsequently identified in a sample.
The major soils of these plains are Chernozems, Cambic Chernozems, Argiluvic Chernozems and reddish-brown soils (Mollisols and Alfisols in U.S.