land reform

(redirected from Redistribution of land)
Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Financial.

land reform:

see agrarian reformagrarian reform,
redistribution of the agricultural resources of a country. Traditionally, agrarian, or land, reform is confined to the redistribution of land; in a broader sense it includes related changes in agricultural institutions, including credit, taxation, rents, and
..... Click the link for more information.
; collective farmcollective farm,
an agricultural production unit including a number of farm households or villages working together under state control. The description of the collective farm has varied with time and place.
..... Click the link for more information.
; ejidoejido
[Span.,=common land], in Mexico, agricultural land expropriated from large private holdings and redistributed to communal farms. Communal ownership of land had been widely practiced by the Aztecs, but the institution was in decline before the Spanish arrived.
..... Click the link for more information.
.
References in periodicals archive ?
As such, it is argued that the redistribution of land physically inscribed political meaning and defined spheres of Mugabe's political control.
Redistribution of land can promote equity as well, which makes land reforms important for promoting social justice.
The 1868 Constitution, for instance, declared that all citizens were entitled to the same "civil, political and public rights." The attainment and protection of these rights depended on a number of factors: the willingness of the national and state Republican Party to defend them by force if necessary against any attempts by the opposition to reverse these gains; accessibility to land for the freedmen; and the willingness of former slaveholders to accede to the demands for such a revolutionary redistribution of land. In less than 30 years after the adoption of the 1868 Constitution all of these gains had been reversed in the face of violence, murder, and mayhem.
The redistribution of land to the black population nine years ago triggered a crisis which reverberates today, according to a new report from The Brooks World Poverty Institute.
Given the fact that 40 per cent of the economically active population in Bolivia is employed in agriculture, one of the most contentious issues in the government's reform program has been the issue of the redistribution of land. In a 2008 study published by the Centre for Economic and Policy Research, progressive economists Mark Weisbrot and Luis Sandoval report that Bolivia is home to one of the most unequal distributions of land in the world: 0.22 per cent of the farm units in Bolivia control over half of the agricultural land, while 84 per cent of farm units control only 2.4 per cent of the land.
The study noted that the redistribution of land or land rights will not be sufficient on their own to achieve gender equality; there must also be a redistribution of socio-economic roles and responsibilities between women and men.
According to the Home Ministry, "predisposing factors" were failure of land reforms to provide tenants with security of tenure of fair rents, or to correct inequalities of landownership through redistribution of land. This is too much of a radical approach for a government which believes in the theory of survival of the fittest.
It is not clear whether his proposed "formal consolidation of land reform" refers to abolition of state ownership over lands (which is manifested in the state's claims over farmers' produce) or the redistribution of land (which would be an impractical proposal since the average individual land holding in Burma is already small).
The strategies include the redistribution of land, incentives to increase the wages of low-skilled labor, utilizing monetary policy for micro loans to encourage entrepreneurship, increased government spending to promote farming and rural nonfarm businesses, increased expenditures on education and health care for the poor, increased world support for NGOs, and debt forgiveness from developed countries.
Among his priorities are the nationalisation of gas and oil and the redistribution of land. He said: 'It is a challenge for all Bolivians to industrialise all our resources in order to overcome poverty.'
While these seemed to be radical reforms, they stopped short of full redistribution of land as had happened in Sparta.
It is hard to see how the redistribution of land together with a land-purchase program could produce an outcome that was worse than the scenario that actually emerged in the Reconstruction South.