reference


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reference

Philosophy
a. the relation between a word, phrase, or symbol and the object or idea to which it refers
b. the object referred to by an expression

reference

References in classic literature ?
With reference to commerce, the proclamation to industrious workmen and to peasants evoked no response.
"In reference," proceeds the Chancellor, still on Jarndyce and Jarndyce, "to the young girl--"
Another reason which Sag-Harbor (he went by that name) urged for his want of faith in this matter of the prophet, was something obscurely in reference to his incarcerated body and the whale's gastric juices.
"Was there any large school near?" I asked him, in reference to the letter.
I directed him, with jocose reference to the collision of interests between us, to address his letter: "Tit for Tat, Post-office, West Strand."
We should therefore solve the question by reference to what the poet says himself, or to what is tacitly assumed by a person of intelligence.
He made no reference to his illness till after the lesson: and then, just as he was leaving, at the door, which he held open, he paused.
As the reference to the Confession passed his lips for the second time, the sinking energy in the woman leaped up in her once more.
The Parable is the designed use of language purposely intended to convey a hidden and secret meaning other than that contained in the words themselves; and which may or may not bear a special reference to the hearer, or reader.
The turn of the expression, however, in her last question, or rather the one chance word, "adventure," lightly as it fell from her lips, recalled my thoughts to my meeting with the woman in white, and urged me to discover the connection which the stranger's own reference to Mrs.
As is apt to be the case when a person stands out in any prominence before the community, and, at the same time, interferes neither with public nor individual interests and convenience, a species of general regard had ultimately grown up in reference to Hester Prynne.
Among the gentry of America; among the well-informed and moderate: in the learned professions; at the bar and on the bench: there is, as there can be, but one opinion, in reference to the vicious character of these infamous journals.

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