Refuse Mound

Refuse Mound

 

layers of ashes (often in the form of a mound) containing animal bones and remains of objects of material culture. The mounds are found in settlements of the late Bronze Age and early Iron Age, chiefly in the forest steppe belt of the northern Prichernomor’e (Black Sea area) and to some extent in the northern Caucasus. They formed as a result of the repeated dumping at one place of ashes from fire hearths, remains of sacrifices and food, domestic refuse, and broken vessels. They are associated with the cult of the domestic hearth and agriculture.

References in periodicals archive ?
The excavation on the refuse mound was actually a control one to facilitate better understanding of the contemporary use of the earthwork and its ditches.
A 3m by 2m area was marked out right at the centre of a refuse mound which was approximately 20 metres long (north to south) by 15 metres wide (east to west).
Three samples for each pottery type that is the Ijebu and Old "Oyo" ceramics complex were selected from the following levels of the refuse mound trench: 60-70, 130-140 and 200-210cm.
Firm Bee'ah was formed in 2007 as a result of a giant refuse mound that was growing in Sharjah at a rate of 13 per cent a year.
They discovered several prehistoric sites, the most important of which contained a midden, or refuse mound.
Prodding the refuse mounds with a wooden-handled bread knife, Gunderson picked a purple plastic glove out of a pile.