regular singular point

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regular singular point

[′reg·yə·lər ¦siŋ·gyə·lər ′pȯint]
(mathematics)
A regular singular point of a differential equation is a singular point of the equation at which none of the solutions has an essential singularity.
References in periodicals archive ?
with an essential singularity at infinity and a regular singularity at zero.
The result is an equation with a regular singularity at zero and an irregular singularity at infinity of higher order:
The generalized Bessel differential equation may also be obtained, aside from any physical or engineering motivations, by a purely mathematical argument, starting from the original Bessel differential equation and replacing the coefficients of the dependent variable and its derivative by polynomials of the independent variable; in this case the origin remains a regular singularity of the differential equation and the only other singularity is the point-at-infinity.
The solutions of the generalized Bessel differential equation around the regular singularity at the origin has (i) indices that are exponents of the leading power depending only on the order; (ii) recurrence relation for the coefficients of the power series expansion depending also on the degree.
The origin is a regular singularity of the generalized Bessel equation with the same indices (Section 2.1) as the original, leading to generalized Bessel functions whose series expansion differs from the original in the coefficients following the leading term.
The origin z = 0 is a regular singularity, and the only other singularity is at infinity; thus [8] the solution as a Frobenius series [5, 9] by the Fuchs theorem [6,10] converges in the whole finite complex z-plane
The origin is a regular singularity and the other singularity is at infinity, so the Frobenius-Fuchs method specifies power series solutions valid in the finite complex plane.
If [z.sub.0] is a regular singularity, then it can be shown that there exists a basis of solutions [B.sub.1](z), ..., [B.sub.n](z) that are linear combinations of elements of the the form