Reichsregiment

Reichsregiment

(rīkhs`rā'gēmĕnt`) [Ger.,=government of the empire], imperial council created by the Diet of Augsburg in 1500. It was intended to form the executive branch of the government of the Holy Roman EmpireHoly Roman Empire,
designation for the political entity that originated at the coronation as emperor (962) of the German king Otto I and endured until the renunciation (1806) of the imperial title by Francis II.
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. Headed by the emperor or by his deputy, it comprised 20 other members representing the ecclesiastic and secular princes, the various estates, and the free cities. The creation of the Reichsregiment (as well as of the imperial court of justice, of an imperial taxation, and of an imperial army) represented a serious but unsuccessful effort toward transforming the Holy Roman Empire into a unified national state. Holy Roman Emperor Maximilian I gave it little support and dissolved it in 1502. His successor, Holy Roman Emperor Charles V, was requested at the Diet of Worms (1521) to restore the Reichsregiment, but he merely gave the council full powers only in the emperor's absence and reduced it to an advisory body at other times. Lacking the support of the emperor, the council failed. It was formally dissolved in 1531.
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References in periodicals archive ?
Though the Diet of Worms had earlier ruled on the error of Luther's teaching, it had succeeded little in quelling the rapid explosion of his ideas in the churches under the safety of Prince Frederick of Saxony, one of the head figures of the Imperial Diet's Governing Council (Reichsregiment).
"On January 20, 1522, the Reichsregiment in Nurnberg ordered Frederick to stop Protestant innovations in the Mass, the flight of monks and nuns from their cloisters, and the marriage of priests in electoral Saxony." (27) This admonishment was not completely lost on Frederick, who was already disinclined to the ecclesial and social changes and quickly announced a "reiteration on Feb 13 that 'disputation, writing, and preaching' were permitted ways to reform, not formal 'innovations' (Newerung) and tumult." (28) Enshrining his own approach to the Luthersache (the Luther problem), this policy was pushed through the Reichsregiment by Frederick's own representative, Hans von der Planitz, against the opposition of the Catholic ecclesiastical princes.
The estates failed to establish a Reichsregiment or central governing body of their own, largely independent of the emperor.