Reiters


Also found in: Dictionary, Thesaurus, Medical.
Related to Reiters: Reiter's syndrome, Reuters
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Reiters

 

a type of cavalry that developed in the mercenary armies of 16th-century Western Europe together with cuirassiers and dragoons to replace the heavy knightly cavalry.

The reiters were armed with a long sword, two pistols, and a rifle or carbine, and they wore a helmet and chest armor. They attacked in dense battle formations. The organization and tactics of the reiters were devised by Maurice of Nassau in the army of the Netherlands. The reiters were mainly of German origin and served in the mercenary regular armies of the German states, Poland, and Sweden, among others. In the early 18th century the reiters were replaced by dragoons and cavalry jaegers. Reiter battalions existed in Russia from the 1630’s to the 1690’s.

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.
References in periodicals archive ?
This newspaper has chronicled the story of Bridgewater's rapid march to town approval, a path rubber stamped by Reiter's town board and other town officials that included a waiver of a traffic study that likely would have raised concerns about the planned driveway to be used by seniors coming out on a 55-mph speedway against Rt.
Bridgewater would appear to have a much tougher road ahead in cashing in on its planned project on land owned by Reiter's mother now that this newspaper has pulled back the covers on how Reiter greased the path for his silent partners to help them get their lucrative deal done without a hint of insider trading.
Once the Bridgewater Estates project was submitted to the town for approvals, Reiter, as supervisor, evaluated whether the project would create any adverse environmental impacts.
Much of their challenge has to do with the fact that Reiter is conflicted.
As the availability of immunohistochemistry and polymerase chain reaction testing becomes more widely available, the number of cases of Reiter's syndrome without a documented infectious cause will likely diminish.
Molecular evidence for the presence of chlamydia in the synovium of patients with Reiter's syndrome.