Rejuvenation

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rejuvenation

[ri‚jü·və′nā·shən]
(geology)
The restoration of youthful features to fluvial landscapes; the renewal of youthful vigor to low-gradient streams is usually caused by regional upwarping of broad areas formerly at or near base level.
(hydrology)
The stimulation of a stream to renew erosive activity.
The renewal of youthful vigor in a mature stream.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Rejuvenation

 

the pruning of the old, leafless branches of a fruit tree to replace them with new branches; one of the principal means of prolonging the productive life of plants. It is used when tree growth decreases, strong shoots or suckers develop, or too many flower buds appear. Generally, 20- to 25-year-old apple and pear trees and ten- to 15-year-old apricot, peach, mazzard, cherry, and plum trees are rejuvenated.

Pruning may be light or heavy. Light pruning, or pinching, is used if bough growth decreases 25 to 30 cm. The bough is severed below a lateral branch that is facing the most desirable direction. The trees are pruned at the end of the fruiting period and during the desiccation period: the boughs are shortened, removing some of the growth from previous years. As a result, the tree does not expend its reserves on abundant flowering and sets less fruit. Pruning is done once every three to six years; the crown should be thinned annually.

With heavy pruning, each bough is cut to one-third of its length, leaving usually a strong sucker, which will serve as a continuation of the branch. Over the next several years, any overgrowth is thoroughly pruned, and strong branches develop. Several shoots develop after heavy pruning, and a new crown is formed from them in three or four years.

E. V. KOLESNIKOV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

Rejuvenation

Aeson
in extreme old age, restored to youth by Medea. [Rom. Myth.: LLEI, I: 322]
apples of perpetual youth
by tasting the golden apples kept by Idhunn, the gods preserved their youth. [Scand. Myth.: Brewer Dictionary, 41]
Bimini Bahamas
island whose fountain conferred eternal youth. [Western Folklore: Brewer Dictionary, 373]
Dithyrambus
epithet of Dionysus, in allusion to his double birth. [Gk. Myth.: Zimmerman, 88]
Faust
rejuvenated by Mephistopheles at the price of his soul. [Ger. Lit.: Goethe Faust]
Fountain
of Youth fabulous fountain believed to restore youth to the aged. [Western Folklore: Brewer Handbook, 389]
Heidegger, Dr.
gives his aged friends water drawn from the Fountain of Youth, but its effects are temporary. [Am. Lit.: Hawthorne “Dr. Heidegger’s Experiment” in Hart, 229]
Ogier
the Dane hero at the age of 100 restored to ripe manhood by Morgan le Fay. [Medieval Romance: Brewer Dictionary, 656]
sage
a rejuvenator; said to stop gray hair. [Herb Symbolism: Flora Symbolica, 165]
Allusions—Cultural, Literary, Biblical, and Historical: A Thematic Dictionary. Copyright 2008 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.