Rehovot

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Rehovot

(rĭhō`vōt) or

Rehoboth

(–bəth), town (1994 pop. 84,900), central Israel. It is the trade center for a large citrus-growing area, and its industries include fruit packing and the production of citrus concentrates. Plastic products, imitation leather, cereals, and pharmaceuticals are also manufactured. Rehovot was founded in 1890 by Jewish immigrants from Russia. Chaim WeizmannWeizmann, Chaim
, 1874–1952, scientist and Zionist leader, first president (1948–52) of Israel, b. Russia, grad. Univ. of Freiburg, 1899. He lectured in chemistry at the Univ. of Geneva (1901–3) and later taught at the Univ. of Manchester.
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, Israel's first president, lived in the town during the British mandate period (1922–48) and is buried there. His house is preserved. The town is the seat of the Weizmann Institute of Science, the Faculty of Agriculture of the Hebrew Univ. of Jerusalem, and the government-run Volcani Institute of Agricultural Research.

Rehovot

 

a city in Israel, in Tel Aviv District. Population, 37,900 (1971). Rehovot is the center of a region producing citrus fruits. There are food industries (dairying, the processing of citrus fruits), and imitation leather is manufactured. A chemical plant is located in the city, as is a scientific research center.

References in periodicals archive ?
(20) My interview with Sofiia Brudner, 19 September 2010, Rekhovot, Israel.
Wooden Gun and the films that followed, such as Transit (Daniel Wachsmann, 1979), Makhbo'yim [Hide and Seek] (Dan Wolman, 1980), Tel Aviv-Berlin (Tzipi Trope, 1986), Haka'itz shel Aviya [The Summer of Aviya] (Eli Cohen, 1988), Rekhovot Ha'etmol [Streets of Yesterday] (Judd Ne'eman, 1989), and Eretz Khadasha [New Land] (Orna Ben-Dor Niv, 1994) "have been labeled 'retro' because they are reminiscent of a recent past and a dead-end future." (3) The "dead-end future" is the ever-growing tangle within Israeli society and between it and the Palestinians; according to Michal Friedman, "this is the tragic present dead end ...
After Churchill's visit, more riots were fomented, starting in Jaffa and spreading to Rekhovot, Petakh Tikvah and Khaderah, leaving forty-seven Jews murdered (including the Ukranian-born Hebrew writer Yosef Haim Brenner) and scores wounded.