Relativistic Effect

Relativistic Effect

 

Physical phenomena observed when the speeds of bodies or particles ν are comparable with the speed of light c are referred to as relativistic effects. Examples of relativistic effects considered in the special theory of relativity are the relativistic contraction of the longitudinal (in the direction of motion) length s, the relativistic dilatation of time, and the increase in mass of a body as the body’s energy increases. For systems of particles, such as atoms and atomic nuclei, where the rotative motion of the particles occurs at speeds ν ≪ c, relativistic effects shift energy levels in proportion to the powers of the ratio v/c. Effects of the general theory of relativity, or the relativistic theory of gravitation, are also said to be relativistic. An example is the slowing of clocks in a strong gravitational field.

References in periodicals archive ?
Also, the major relativistic effect such as the retardation effect is not implemented due to numerical complexity.
In this sense, the absorption of the O-mode is a purely relativistic effect, something very important for the assessment of ITER/DEMO ECRH efficiency because the current technological limits in wave sources force the use of the mode O1.
The most surprising feature of this phenomenon is the fact that this relativistic effect is important even for a weakly relativistic electron.
So, by only a complete relativistic effect, an electron can form a Hydrogen atomic orbital without any nucleus.
We observe the same relativistic effect that provided the first clues that Isaac Newton's theory was not the final word on gravity.
Spin-charge conversion in inorganic semiconductors and metals has mainly relied on the spin-orbit interaction, a fundamental relativistic effect which couples the motion of electrons to their spins.
We also observed that the pulses arrived later at the telescope when they passed close to the white dwarf, another relativistic effect," says Nice.
Evidently, spin interaction is a relativistic effect and the significant [pi], [rho] mass difference indicates that strong interactions are very strong indeed.
The relativistic effect needs to be measured by an array of synchronized clocks as the spacecraft speeds by them.
We conclude the relativistic effect discussed here in virtue of the Earth rotation may lead to a misinterpretation of the elapsed time within the block of detectors at Gran Sasso.
After correcting for this relativistic effect, Mirabel and Rodriguez calculate that the blobs in their study actually move at 92 percent of the speed of light.
On the other hand, the dipole anisotropy of the EMB, being a purely relativistic effect due to the rapid motion of the field's source, the Earth, through the weak intergalactic field, is independent from altitude.

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