response

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response

1. Bridge a bid replying to a partner's bid or double
2. Christianity a short sentence or phrase recited or sung by the choir or congregation in reply to the officiant at a church service
3. Electronics the ratio of the output to the input level, at a particular frequency, of a transmission line or electrical device
4. any pattern of glandular, muscular, or electrical reactions that arises from stimulation of the nervous system

response

[ri′späns]
(communications)
(control systems)
A quantitative expression of the output of a device or system as a function of the input. Also known as system response.
(statistics)
The value of some measurable quantity after a treatment has been applied.
References in periodicals archive ?
The endothelial-dependent relaxation response to ACh (1 mM) in the control rats was higher than in the diabetic rats, which was increased after the incubation of the extracts (100 [micro]M) in the control and diabetic groups (Figure 4).
A successful health coach will emphasize lots of laughter, doing volunteer work, giving and receiving affection, a optimistic attitude, the relaxation response, and a religious faith as effective tools and skills.
The relaxation response can also be achieved through repetitive activities, such as running, yoga, knitting or playing a musical instrument.
The music is soft, relaxing, comforting, even ethereal in its composition, and designed to aid in effecting the body's relaxation response.
It is a way of interfering with the fight-or-flight response and eliciting the body's normal relaxation response. Lower Cortisol levels and higher melatonin activity are maintained by deep breathing.
The effects of the relaxation response on nurses' level of anxiety, depression, well-being, work-related stress, and confidence to teach patients.
"Repetitive prayer--like the rosary--breaks the train of everyday thinking and evokes the relaxation response, which counteracts the harmful effects of stress," Benson says.
Even brief meditation triggers the relaxation response, an aspect of the parasympathetic nervous system, which boosts well-being, cognition, immunity and more.
One of the most effective is to practice meditation, yoga, deep breathing, or repetitive prayer--all of which help produce the relaxation response, a physiologic state of deep rest.
They analysed sitting meditation of common forms such as: Samatha; Vipassana (Insight Meditation); Mindful Meditation; Zen Meditation (Zazen); Raja Yoga; Loving-Kindness (Metta); Transcendental Meditation; and Relaxation Response.
Benson, using the Relaxation Response is beneficial as it counteracts physiological effects of stress and the fight or flight response.