Relict Soils

Relict Soils

 

soils whose structure and properties contain features that developed under soil-forming conditions different from those of the present. Examples of relict soils include the laterite soils in the Australian deserts, soils found outside the areas of present-day permafrost but bearing obvious traces of permafrost phenomena, and soils with thick humus horizons that occur on the forested river terraces of the forest zone. A distinction is made between relict soils proper, in which the basic properties have a relict character (for example, the laterite soils in deserts or in temperate climates) and soils with relict characteristics, in which relict features do not play a decisive role (for example, ferruginous concretions in chernozem, attesting to excess soil moisture in the past).

Mentioned in ?
References in periodicals archive ?
Buried, exhumed, and relict soils delineate ancient surfaces that may have undergone weathering processes for long periods.
i) Relict soils, which have remained on the current land surface since the rime of initial formation but do not necessarily reflect the processes forming today's soil;
Paleosols studied in northwest Canada include multiple buried soils between tills and relict soils developed in glacial deposits of varying ages (Rutter et al.
The Mediterranean countries thus contain a mosaic of old, even relict soils beside recently-formed soils with well-defined characteristics.
In the alluvial system of the Condamine valley, relict soils were recognised by Beckmann and Thompson (1984).