Relict

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relict

1. Ecology
a. a group of animals or plants that exists as a remnant of a formerly widely distributed group in an environment different from that in which it originated
b. (as modifier): a relict fauna
2. Geology
a. a mountain, lake, glacier, etc., that is a remnant of a pre-existing formation after a destructive process has occurred
b. a mineral that remains unaltered after metamorphism of the rock in which it occurs
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

Relict

(rel -ikt) A Soviet space mission launched in 1983 that made the first measurement of dipole anisotropy in the cosmic microwave background radiation.
Collins Dictionary of Astronomy © Market House Books Ltd, 2006
The following article is from The Great Soviet Encyclopedia (1979). It might be outdated or ideologically biased.

Relict

 

an animal or plant species that exists in a given country or region as a remnant of the flora and fauna of past geological ages and that in some way is anomalous with regard to present-day conditions of existence. Relicts are identified by their ties to the plant and animal world of past ages or to definite types of vegetation. Thus, species that have been preserved without visible changes at least since the Pliocene are called Tertiary or, more correctly, Neogenic relicts.

In Colchis there are a number of remnant tree species (wing nut, zelkova, chestnut) and evergreen shrubs. The ironwood is a relict in the Talysh Mountains, and the muskrat is a relict in the Volga and Ural basins. Forest relicts in the arctic are species that advanced far to the north during the warm interglacial age and stayed there surrounded by tundra (twinflower, whortleberry, certain wintergreens). Glacial relicts are plants and animals that have survived from the ice age on a given territory.

Plant and animal species that have been preserved only in certain sectors of formerly large ranges and in this sense resemble relicts are called pseudorelicts.

A. I. TOLMACHEV

The Great Soviet Encyclopedia, 3rd Edition (1970-1979). © 2010 The Gale Group, Inc. All rights reserved.

relict

[′rel·ikt]
(biology)
A persistent, isolated remnant of a once-abundant species.
(geology)
Referring to a topographic feature that remains after other parts of the feature have been removed or have disappeared.
Pertaining to a mineral, structure, or feature of a rock which represents features of an earlier rock and which persists in spite of processes tending to destroy it, such as metamorphism.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Woodland managers wishing to conserve characteristic woodland understory plant assemblages and vegetation, including specialist and relictual species, frequently control and/ or exclude deer (Dolman et al.
La subtribu Attaleinae es mayormente diversificada en America del Sur, pero hay un genero relictual en Africa del Sur, Jubaeopsis, y dos en Madagascar (Voanioala y Beccariophoenix).
Palabras clave: Chaco, Bosque relictual, Avifauna, Composicion, situacion y caracteristicas funcionales
Their presence in a relictual mammal suggest that the adaptive pressure is so important as the evolutionary level in the anatomical organisation of each organ, and in this fossorial animal, may be correlated with its adaptation to the niche.
Dry-mesic upland forest, bluff and ravine forest, floodplain forest; contains relictual Tsuga canadensis.
The presence of this species in a deep mesophytic ravine harboring other relictual species reinforces data from vascular-plant studies documenting these habitats in the Niobrara River Valley as a postglacial corridor and refugium of considerable phytogeographic significance (Kaul et al.
Oligocene fossils of todies and motmots (Momotidae) from Wyoming and France, for example, indicate that the current ranges of these two groups are relictual (Olson 1976, Mourer-Chauvir[acute{e}] 1986, Feduccia 1996).
Slatkin's (1981, 1985) private alleles method was not used to estimate gene flow because there were a limited number of loci (Slatkin and Barton 1989), there were only a small number of private alleles (Slatkin 1985), and the potential confounding problems caused by relictual private alleles (Whitkus and Crawford 1987).