Remembrance of Things Past

Remembrance of Things Past

records the decay of a society. [Fr. Lit.: Haydn & Fuller, 630]
References in periodicals archive ?
As Ian outlined details of his father's service, Harold provided the colour, chipping in with recollections of people, places and battles: the turbulent remembrance of things past.
However, remembrance of things past is not necessarily the remembrance of things as they were, and certainly there is no flag large enough to cover their shame of killing innocent people in yet another failed war: -Military experts and officials at the Pentagon are clear: The US-led War on Terror has failed.
Eve was teaching a yearlong Proust course, in which students read Remembrance of Things Past over the course of the entire year.
Translator Andre Naffis-Sahely has explained, in a dispatch for Words Without Borders , why Scott Moncrieff's Remembrance of Things Past leaves its mark on histranslation of these novels, and, in The Independent , Boyd Tonkin also writes about the "heroic" act of translating this series.
With that opening sentence, Alan Lightman (Einstein's Dreams) invites us into his own remembrance of things past in his elegant memoir, Screening Room: Family Pictures.
Although the United States reaped its title of the worldAEs most powerful country as a result of its 18-month engagement in the war to end all wars, which saw 10 million lose their lives, Ells sees the conflict as slipping from the remembrance of things past, particularly the American experience, and aims to correct that trend.
Dostoyevsky and Proust gave their characters outrageous names, inspired by the French merde and by Dickens' Murdstone in David Copperfield and Merdle in Little Dorrit: Smerdyakov in The Brothers Karamazov and Cambremer[de], which stops just in time, in Remembrance of Things Past.
Essayist and philosopher-for-the-masses Alain de Botton is best known for How Proust Can Change Your Life, in which he plumbs Remembrance of Things Past for lessons on how to live a more fulfilling life.
IN Remembrance of Things Past - a seven-volume, 3,200-page novel that is often called one of the great works of 20th century literature - the memories that make up much of the book are unleashed when the main character eats a small French cake called a madeleine and it reminds him of eating a similar patisserie as a child.
To my mind, Lives and Letters is a matter of rearranging our sight lines in remembrance of things past.
Plagued by illness from childhood, the author was very much in tune with medicine, which he pondered often in Remembrance of Things Past (1913), his monumental novel on the nature of memory.
Marcel Proust strolled in the Bois de Boulogne most days as a young man but there is no mention of Longchamp in Remembrance Of Things Past.