Rendell


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Rendell

Ruth (Barbara), Baroness. born 1930, British crime writer: author of detective novels, such as Wolf to the Slaughter (1967), and psychological thrillers, such as The Lake of Darkness (1980) and (under the name Barbara Vine) A Fatal Inversion (1987) and The Chimney Sweeper's Boy (1998)
References in periodicals archive ?
Montgomery's attempts to claw clear Rendell's effort from Jim Kellerman's corner proved fruitless as a linesman's flag decreed the ball had crossed the line.
Pupils from Rendell Primary School, Cobden Primary School and Loughborough Church of England Primary School all took part in the church's Christmas card competition by submitting entries during the church's annual Christmas Tree Festival, and Fabiha's winning entry will be sent out by the church across Loughborough.
"There are certain areas where it's easier because either there is a large supply of similar material or [products] are in editions, so you can easily work out the impact what another one in an edition of 50 has made," Rendell explains.
This is Rendell at her most subtle, showing how small, seemingly meaningless actions lead to momentous consequences and coolly demonstrating that conscience and the dark corners of our mind, are far more powerful and terrible than any outside influence.
Rendell, after all, had elevated the chunky airport murder tome into a work of innovative literary fiction.
Rendell was best known for her detective novels featuring Chief Inspector Reginald Wexford, which were made into a popular TV series starring George Baker alongside Christopher Ravenscroft as sidekick Det Insp Mike Burden.
Rendell produced a steady stream of best-sellers for more than a half a century in a career that began on the lowest rung of local journalism and ended on the benches of the House of Lords.
Baroness Gail Rebuck, of publisher Penguin Random LOYAL: House, said: "Ruth was a great writer, a campaigner for social justice, a proud mother and grandmother and a generous and loyal friend." Ed Miliband said: "Ruth Rendell served the Labour Party in the House of Lords with great loyalty and passion."
Rendell's first novel, "From Doon With Death", was published in 1964 and she since wrote several award-winning books, including "A Demon in My View" in 1976 and "Live Flesh" ten years later.
"Nearly everyone had their dead salmon toy," Whitehead and Rendell write in The Cultural Lives of Whales and Dolphins.