Rendoll

Rendoll

[′ren‚däl]
(geology)
A suborder of the soil order Mollisol, formed in highly calcareous parent materials, mostly restricted to humid, temperate regions; the soil profile consists of a dark upper horizon grading to a pale lower horizon.
References in periodicals archive ?
The soils were, according to the New Zealand Soil Classification (Hewitt 1998; USDA Classification in parentheses), Recent Gley (Aquent) and Pallic (Fragiochrept) soils of poor structural stability and Brown (Dystrochrept) and Melanic (Rendoll) soils of good structural stability.
These trees grow in soils with calcareous structure of biological origin (mollusk shells) classified as Rendoll (Sanchez et al., 1976).
The aim of the present work was to characterize and illustrate morphological features of alkalophilic and alkali-tolerant soil Ascomycota at two different depths in each soil: Rendoll, Natracualf and Argialbol by using soil washing methods for isolation.
The pH ranges varied from acid soils (Argialbol) to alkaline (Rendoll and Natracualf).
LPS culture No 833 isolated from Rendoll at 20cm deep horizon and Natracualf soils, at pH 6, 8 and 11.
Contact: Oscar Rendoll, General Manager of the National Dispatch Center and SIEPAC representative for Panama.
Field studies were conducted in 1991, 1992, and 1993 at Brain sur I'Authion (Anjou, France) on a clay limestone soil (Mollisol, Rendoll, eutrochreptic soil - U.S.
Soils of subalpine and alpine belts are acid brown soils (typic and lithic Hapludolls or typic Haplumbrept) or brown rendzinas (lithic Rendolls).
In the United States the dominant suborders of Mollisols appear as sequential bands across the country reflecting the moisture regimes in which each Mollisol developed: Albolls, Aquolls, Cryolls, Rendolls, Udolls, Ustolls, and Xerolls (Table 3-5; Figure 3-13).
* Rendolls are Mollisols that formed in humid regions in highly calcareous parent materials such as limestone, chalk, and drift in places such as Florida, tropical islands, and a few mountainous regions in the western United States.
Most of the soils are Rendolls, Lithic or Vertic subgroups depending on their topographic situation, that have developed in calcium carbonate-rich parent materials under tropical forest covers (Soil Conservation Staff).