Rendsburg


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Rendsburg

(rĕnts`bo͝orkh), city (1994 pop. 31,376), Schleswig-Holstein, N central Germany, a port on the Eider River and the Kiel Canal. The city's manufactures include textiles, fertilizer, and machinery, and there is extensive shipbuilding and ironworking as well as a large agricultural market. Rendsburg passed to the counts of Holstein in 1252 and was chartered soon thereafter. When Schleswig-Holstein rose (1848–51) against Denmark, Rendsburg was made the provisional capital. The Danes, however, regained control of the city and razed (1852–56) its fortress. In 1866, Rendsburg was annexed by Prussia. It has a 13th-century church and a 16th-century city hall.
References in periodicals archive ?
The building management Schleswig-Holstein AE[micro]R (GMSH) writes a framework agreement for mail and parcel services in the name and for the account of Rendsburg - from EckernfE[micro]rde.
Hendel (1996) and Faber (1992) present attractive arguments that do not depend on problematic assumptions of differences in the number of sibilant phonemes preserved in the two dialects in question, (2) as so many other explanations of the story have done, (3) including Rendsburg (1988a; 1988b; 1996: 511; 1997: 69f.
Rendsburg, "The Inclusio in Leviticus xi," VT 43 (1993): 418-21.
Rendsburg, "The Ammonite Phoneme /T/," BASOR 269 [1988]: 73-79; E.
Rendsburg, "UT 68 and the Tell Asmar Seal," Orientalia 53 (1984): 448-52, suggests that this seal is "but another example of the continuous narrative or linear sequence in ancient art" (p.
23) demonstrates aw [is greater than] & discussed at great length by Rendsburg (1990), with parallels from Tripoli, Kfar-Abida, Galilee Bedouin and Druze, as well as the Negev Bedouin.
Rendsburg, among others, have assembled impressive philological cases for a pre-exilic dating of P.
Contract notice: Renting office buildings frequented by the public in rendsburg.
27 in the northern town of Rendsburg, footage from news channel ntv showed.
The irony is that a number of twentieth century scholars who argued for a theory of single authorship for Genesis, like Umberto Cassuto, Gary Rendsburg, and Roger Whybray, denied Mosaic authorship, dating Genesis anywhere from the tenth century (Rendsburg) to the sixth century B.
Rendsburg, "The Guilty Party in 1 Kings III 16-28," VT 48 (1998), pp.
Emirates) as well as in its Nobiskrug shipyard in Rendsburg (Germany).