Renga


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Renga

 

(linked verse), a genre of Japanese poetry popular in the 15th and 16th centuries. Several poets, generally three, collaborated on a single renga. Each in turn composed a stanza based on images in the preceding stanza. The result was a chain of stanzas in the form of a tanka, but longer, reaching 100 and sometimes 1,000 stanzas. The classical renga was usually a nature lyric. Its composition, like that of the tanka, was governed by strict rules. A humorous renga, the haikai renga, developed alongside the classical renga and was free in choice of themes and images. The three-line hokku, or haiku, originated from the first stanza of the humorous renga.

REFERENCES

Basho. Lirika. Moscow, 1964.
Grigor’eva, T., and V. Logunova. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1964.
Literatura Vostoka v srednie veka, vol. 1. Moscow, 1970.
Konrad, N. I. Ocherki iaponskoi literatury. Moscow, 1973.
Konrad, N.I. Iaponskaia literatura. Moscow, 1974.
References in periodicals archive ?
Each of us individually composed a renga of four stanzas, with each stanza representing one of the pantoums created by community participants.
Basho distingue o haiku do tanka (e o renga com uma das suas formas), considerando o primeiro como expressao da experiencia instantanea.
Among them, the advertising model, which includes text and banner ads, affiliate ads, and sponsorships, is the most commonly used by SNS (Enders et ah, 2008; Nogueira-Cortimiglia, Ghezzi, & Renga, 2011).
When describing the renga composition, Marcus says, "Its fusion of poetic cultivation, intuitive interaction and mastery of complex rules and techniques calls to mind jazz improvisation at a virtuoso level of group performance."
In the heartbreaking "Syria Renga," a young man calls his mother, who speaks to him in code as he scans "a YouTube of the demo/ on his Apple screen / but not his younger brother's / face in the tide of faces." In "Sahar al-Beitunia," a girl's name means "dawn," but an Israeli wall slicing through her Palestinian village has divided "the doors of Beitunia" from the "seventeen thousand dunams/ of orchards and wheatfields" where she and her neighbors once farmed.
Selvaratnam revealed that the desert-style track was created by his father, Renga, during the seventies.
The seventh chapter looks closely at other aspects of Edo-period secondary nature, discussing the influence of haikai in adding a new layer of vulgar seasonal associations to those already derived from waka and renga, the elaboration of associations through parody, the influence of works on Chinese herbalism, and the effects of printing and Western technology on visual representations of nature.