Living Church

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Living Church

 

one of the basic groups seeking renewal within the Russian Orthodox Church after the October Revolution of 1917 and the Civil War of 1918–20. Organized in 1922, it continued in existence until the end of the Great Patriotic War (1941–45). The members of the movement sought to “renew” the church, to adapt it to changed political conditions; they were loyal to Soviet power.

References in periodicals archive ?
Roslof, Red Priests: Renovationism, Russian Orthodoxy, and Revolution, 1904-1946 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002).
Renovationism reached its peak with the Council of 1923, and by the end of World War II, it was a dead institution.
Other accounts of renovationism focus on the peak of its power, from 1922 to 1925.
7) The document expressed sentiments such as the following: "The essence of the dangers and problems (that threaten peace and orderly course of church life) can be expressed in a single phrase: the gracious core of the Russian church being eaten away by two destructive diseases, two insidious heresies: renovationism and ecumenism.
Renovationism offered him a useful and willing alternative.
Roslof regards renovationism as a lost opportunity for Orthodox engagement with society.
Roslof, Red Priests: Renovationism, Russian Orthodoxy, and Revolution, 1905-1946 (Bloomington: Indiana University Press, 2002); Kate Transchel, Under the Influence: Working-Class Drinking, Temperance, and Cultural Revolution in Russia, 1895-1932 (Pittsburgh: University of Pittsburgh Press, 2006); Sharon A.
20) But at the heart of the chapters on the Soviet era is a fascinating account, based partly on extensive interviews, of the central role played by former sisters and chernichki in the Voronezh and Tambov regions in establishing and maintaining informal networks that through the 1930s helped bishops maintain contacts with the faithful and resist Renovationism.
21) Emerging in 1921-22, Renovationism was a movement in the Russian Orthodox Church that sought both to introduce reforms intended to adapt church organization, liturgy, and other practices to modern conditions and to reconcile the church with the Soviet state.
Before the appearance of the new, schismatic Renovationism in May 1922, only two well known schismatic developments existed in the territory of the Soviet state.
However, those who want to see a genuine church reform movement in the Renovationism of the 1920s, and a legitimate link to the reformists of 1905, will point to the numerous letters by such Renovationist leaders as Vvedenskii, Krasnitskii, Kalinovskii, and Belkov, begging the Soviet government to pardon Metropolitan Veniamin and other members of the clergy and laity condemned to death in 1922.
Supposedly, believers understood this and therefore did not consider Renovationists to be true priests or attend their churches; this circumstance is offered as the principal reason for the extraction of Renovationism by the mid-1940s.