Living Church

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Living Church

 

one of the basic groups seeking renewal within the Russian Orthodox Church after the October Revolution of 1917 and the Civil War of 1918–20. Organized in 1922, it continued in existence until the end of the Great Patriotic War (1941–45). The members of the movement sought to “renew” the church, to adapt it to changed political conditions; they were loyal to Soviet power.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among them, Alexei Yurchak's account of komsomol'tsy unconsciously practicing post-Soviet behavior before 1991, Stephen Kotkin's structuralist approach to why Mikhail Gorbachev's renovationist efforts were doomed, and Serguei Oushakine's exploration of psychic trauma in Barnaul have nearly owned the territory, ceding some slight ground to biographies such as Archie Brown's sympathetic handling of an embattled Gorbachev, Tim Colton's apologia for Boris Yeltsin, and Leon Arons more fawning treatment.
The Renovationist movement emerged out of the church reform movement and the sobors (councils) of 1905 and 1917.
He then follows its decline and eventual demise, from the infighting that characterized the years of Renovationist power to the eventual liquidation of the Renovationists by the Soviet government.
In the religious sphere, the Renovationist Schism served as a means to blind the outside world to the magnitude of the Communist religious persecutions.
The Renovationist experiment, however, proved to be precedent-setting; thus, its interest transcends the borders of the USSR and the time frame of this essay, roughly, the 1920s.
Beglov also offers some interesting information on the "Renovationist" Church in the 1940s, which suggests, in contrast to the prevailing view, that some believers continued to consider Renovationist priests to be genuine and legitimate, and that Renovationist parishes not only existed in the underground but also were reborn and legalized under the Nazi occupation and continued to predominate in certain regions (e.
schisms" (the Renovationists and the Grigorians), the cause of conflict with the "Tikhonovites" (including the "Sergiites") involved a similar disagreement over principle: namely, the official church's pro-monastic, socially conservative policy.
Chapter 3 covers the years of the New Economic Policy (1921-28), providing a survey of the many church schisms (the Renovationist schism in 1922 and the schisms resulting from Metropolitan Sergii's 1927 declaration of loyalty to the Soviet Union).
Although renovationists disagreed among themselves about aims and organization, at the time of the Russian Revolution they generally sought separation of church and state, democratic conciliarism as the principle governing church administration, the Gregorian calendar in place of the Julian, and Russian rather than Church Slavonic as the language of the liturgy.
They announced to the astonished renovationists a "religious NEP," meaning a halt in the campaign against the traditional church.
Self-styled patriotic renovationists not only seized the initiative in calling for a "new order" abroad and "new structure" at home but also made it clear that these goals were inseparable.
The clergy was split between those who had been repressed in the 1930s and renovationists, who had gone much further to forge common cause with the regime.