Living Church

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Living Church

 

one of the basic groups seeking renewal within the Russian Orthodox Church after the October Revolution of 1917 and the Civil War of 1918–20. Organized in 1922, it continued in existence until the end of the Great Patriotic War (1941–45). The members of the movement sought to “renew” the church, to adapt it to changed political conditions; they were loyal to Soviet power.

References in periodicals archive ?
Among them, Alexei Yurchak's account of komsomol'tsy unconsciously practicing post-Soviet behavior before 1991, Stephen Kotkin's structuralist approach to why Mikhail Gorbachev's renovationist efforts were doomed, and Serguei Oushakine's exploration of psychic trauma in Barnaul have nearly owned the territory, ceding some slight ground to biographies such as Archie Brown's sympathetic handling of an embattled Gorbachev, Tim Colton's apologia for Boris Yeltsin, and Leon Arons more fawning treatment.
A 'renovationist', pro-communist schism from the mainstream church was temporarily encouraged and instrumentalised by the regime between 1922 and 1927.
The Renovationist movement emerged out of the church reform movement and the sobors (councils) of 1905 and 1917.
Within the civilian ministries, the counterpart to the military hawks and innovative new zaibatsu was a loosely linked cadre known as the "new bureaucrats" (shin kanryo) or "renovationist bureaucrats" (kakushin kanryo)--accomplished technocrats devoted to wedding the new order abroad to new institutional structures at home.
The last hope of church renewal was destroyed by the "renovationist" movement, in reaction to which the thought of even the smallest reform could evoke nothing but revulsion among the faithful.
In the 1920s the authorities tried to weaken and ultimately destroy the church by promoting dissent from "renovationist" circles in the church; it is probable today that there are forces interested in reaching the same goal but now with help from the opposite direction -- the fundamentalist wing.
By the end of the 1920s, the government, faced with widespread popular resistance to its antireligious measures and the failure of the pro-Soviet "Renovationist Church" to win significant support, allowed what remained of the Russian Orthodox Church to continue a de facto, but not a de jure, existence under close supervision.
In the religious sphere, the Renovationist Schism served as a means to blind the outside world to the magnitude of the Communist religious persecutions.
Beglov also offers some interesting information on the "Renovationist" Church in the 1940s, which suggests, in contrast to the prevailing view, that some believers continued to consider Renovationist priests to be genuine and legitimate, and that Renovationist parishes not only existed in the underground but also were reborn and legalized under the Nazi occupation and continued to predominate in certain regions (e.g., the North Caucasus) under those circumstances (127-28, 157, 196, 229-30).
Chapter 3 covers the years of the New Economic Policy (1921-28), providing a survey of the many church schisms (the Renovationist schism in 1922 and the schisms resulting from Metropolitan Sergii's 1927 declaration of loyalty to the Soviet Union).
While the WP represented the traditional small businessmen, Erdogan represented the "renovationists" appealing more to the internationalising Islamic bourgeoisie in search of further integration with the world market and transforming itself into finance capital.
Coun Hindmarsh, a member of Lynemouth Parish Council, blamed "uncaring house renovationists" who he said had acted "with no regard for the environment or for the feelings of people who have relatives interred there.