Repeal Association


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Repeal Association

 

a movement founded by D. O’Connell in April 1840 in order to agitate for the repeal of the Anglo-Irish legislative union of 1801 and the restoration of the Irish Parliament. A left wing, grouped around the newspaper The Nation, was formed within the association in 1842. In opposition to the leadership, which regarded agitation for the repeal of the union as the only means of obtaining concessions from the British government, the left-wingers favored revolutionary methods. In 1847 they founded the Irish Confederation after splitting off from the Repeal Association. The association later disbanded.

References in classic literature ?
To illustrate the effect of slavery on the white man,--to show that he has no powers of endurance, in such a condition, superior to those of his black brother,--DANIEL O'CONNELL, the distinguished advocate of universal emancipation, and the mighti- est champion of prostrate but not conquered Ireland, relates the following anecdote in a speech delivered by him in the Conciliation Hall, Dublin, before the Loyal National Repeal Association, March 31, 1845.
The result was the manufactured controversy over the "godless colleges," the peace resolutions, and the split of the Repeal Association.
After founding the Loyal National Repeal Association in spring 1840, O'Connell's opposition to slavery continued, with weekly anti-slavery reports being read at meetings of the Repeal Association in Dublin.
Anti-slavery reports were also read at the weekly meetings of the Repeal Association in Dublin.
He was a leader of the local Repeal Association and an intellectual, lecturing to the Mechanics' Institute and the Literary Association.
Sadly, it appears that records of the Repeal Association, which had also been stored there, had perished.
He showed that the introduction of the controversial Peace Resolutions in the Repeal Association in 1846 was not merely a vexatious ploy to drive out the Young Ireland party, but was necessary to ensure the very survival of the Repeal movement.
Making little progress on that front O'Connell launched another countrywide organisation, the Repeal Association, which stoked up the temperature in Ireland with a series of mass meetings, in the hope of repeating the pressure tactics on the new Tory Prime Minister Peel that had worked a decade before over Emancipation.
Daniel O'Connell and the Repeal Association is also mentioned, and that the founders of the national newspaper gave "every support to O'Connell's campaign to repeal the Act of Union." Several references are given to the Trinity College alumni, Catholic and Protestant, who shared Davis' convictions on Irish nationality: John Pigot, John O'Hagan, Thomas Mac Nevin, Denis Florence McCarthy, Michael Joseph Barry, and Denny Lane were friends who shared Davis' nationalism.