Teshuvah

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Teshuvah

September-October; during the month of Tishri between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur
The ten days between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur are known to Jews as Aseret Yemey Tushuvah, or Ten Days of Penitence . They are a time for reflection, introspection, and repentance, during which people apologize to one another for any wrongs they may have committed during the previous year. The Hebrew word teshuvah means "turning." According to tradition, an unfavorable verdict about one's behavior may be changed by repentance and charity. Each day the famous prayer of confession, which begins "Our Father, our King," is recited at the service in the temple.
In Palestine, pilgrimages are made during this period to the tomb of Rachel and other sacred burial places, as well as to the graves of relatives. In other countries, it is customary to visit the local cemetery. No weddings or banquets may be held during these days, and scholarly Jews spend their time reading and studying the sacred books.
The atmosphere during this time is not one of sadness but of thoughtfulness and kindness. Jews often greet one another by saying, Gemar Hatimah Tovah, which means, "May the final verdict be favorable."
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