compulsion

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compulsion

Psychiatry an inner drive that causes a person to perform actions, often of a trivial and repetitive nature, against his or her will

compulsion

[kəm′pəl·shən]
(psychology)
An irresistible, impulsive act performed by an individual against his conscious will and usually arising from an obsession.
References in periodicals archive ?
such doubling through the Freudian concept of repetition compulsion.
A relevant and widely recognized concept, which "has received surprisingly little systematic exploration" (Van der Kolk 1989: 389), is repetition compulsion, formally noted by Freud and reflecting the phenomenon that "[m]any traumatized people expose themselves, seemingly compulsively, to situations reminiscent of the original trauma" (Van der Kolk 1989: 389).
In Beyond Pleasure Principle, Freud attributes repetition compulsion to pleasure principle, i.e.
Without doubt the repetition compulsion, that inexorable psychic process (Freud, 1914), crisscrossed the therapeutic relationship in many different ways.
Any danger of radical overturning of theory like Bataille's will encounter social magma and repetition compulsion
The author states: "The repetition compulsion was alive in regard to constant replaying of someone attacking the other resulting in a sense of psychic death or a state of overwhelming stimulation" (Goodman, 2013, p.
There's an antidote to the repetition compulsion for war.
When one views Schorsch's "Square Repetition Compulsion" (2012) on its own, it compels for all the reasons I have stated.
Thus he contests Freud's and Lacan's "theories of the death drive," arguing that his own theory involving the "chronolibidinal notion of binding allows for a better account of the trauma, violence, and repetition compulsion of psychic life" (18), while showing how Derrida "stages this double bind in his own text" and thus linking Derrida's writing to that of Proust, Woolf, and Nabokov (18).
Once he has accomplished this dismissal of his physical state, he struggles with situational control--he returns to the streets in an act of repetition compulsion which only increases his exposure to the very ills he seeks to escape.
Rather than the repetition compulsion usually identified with the uncanny, the French critic sees here the "frustration de la repetition [frustration of repetition]" (161).
As Park writes in one of the most provocative and encompassing statements in this book, "Repetition compulsion is the curse of modern subjectivity inherited from the Enlightenment" (221).