replacement

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replacement

1. Geology the growth of a mineral within another of different chemical composition by gradual simultaneous deposition and removal
2. a process of fossilization by gradual substitution of mineral matter for the original organic matter
Collins Discovery Encyclopedia, 1st edition © HarperCollins Publishers 2005

replacement

[ri′plās·mənt]
(geology)
Growth of a new or chemically different mineral in the body of an old mineral by simultaneous capillary solution and deposition.
(paleontology)
Substitution of inorganic matter for the original organic constituents of an organism during fossilization.
McGraw-Hill Dictionary of Scientific & Technical Terms, 6E, Copyright © 2003 by The McGraw-Hill Companies, Inc.
References in periodicals archive ?
Nearly 100,000 knee replacements were carried out in 2016, but fewer than one in 10 patients have a partial replacement, a procedure where only the affected part of the knee joint is replaced.
In the internal document, Apple reportedly said batteries for iPhone 6 Plus replacements won't be available until late march to early April for U.S.
"Ankle replacements are becoming more common but, in comparison, there are around 77,000 hip replacements, 85,000 knee replacements and just 550 ankle replacements each year in the UK."
This requires the surgeon to have expertise in joint replacement of the hip, knee, shoulder, elbow, and ankle.
The technology of total knee replacements is advanced and proven.
IMSA-qualified companies make a commitment to offering producer training that clearly sets forth the company's replacement policies and procedures and that provides guidance as to when replacements may be appropriate.
The state's Division on Housing and Community Renewal has approved what is believed to be the biggest window replacement program of its kind in the nation's history.
Passenger replacement tire shipments are anticipated to grow to a record-setting 205 million units this year, according to the Rubber Manufacturers Association.
The goal is to find suitable replacements that reduce the emission characteristics of the carbonaceous additives generated during metalcasting without sacrificing the quality of castings.
Because it takes a long time for the natural bone to grow and attach to the prosthesis, people with uncemented replacements must limit activities for up to 3 months to protect the hip joint.
What will be the costs of these repairs and replacements, and how will the overall expenditures for these things relate to existing and future resources?
Fifty years ago, when partial hip replacements were in the pioneering stage, the results were often disappointing.