Resaca de la Palma


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Resaca de la Palma

(rāsä`kä thā lä päl`mä), valley, an abandoned bed of the Rio Grande, N of Brownsville, Tex., where the second battle of the Mexican War was fought, May 9, 1846. Mexican troops under Gen. Mariano Arista, retreating south after the battle of Palo AltoPalo Alto,
locality not far from Brownsville, Tex., where the first battle of the Mexican War was fought on May 8, 1846. American troops under Gen. Zachary Taylor defeated a Mexican force led by Gen. Mariano Arista, who retreated to Resaca de la Palma.
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, were defeated by American forces led by Gen. Zachary Taylor.
References in periodicals archive ?
We can examine the ways such mythmaking occurred by tracing the path of print production shortly after a specific event during the Mexican War, the Battle of Resaca de la Palma, on May 9, 1846.
The two Mexican War-era textiles featured on quilts from the Winedale and Winterthur collections are similar in that they display copies of different popular lithographs of the same battle scene at Resaca de la Palma on May 9, 1846.
A veteran of the War of 1812, Black Hawk War (1832) and Second Seminole War (1837-40), Taylor became a national hero after his victories at Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterrey and Buena Vista in Mexico.
Principal battles: Fort Erie (1814); Fort Drane (1836); Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma, Monterrey (1846); Puebla (1847).
Zachary Taylor's army in southern Texas (1845); and took part in Taylor's operations against Mexican forces at Palo Alto and Resaca de la Palma (May 8-9); wounded at Monterrey (September 20-24, 1846); served as an aide to Gen.
Principal battles: Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma (both near Brownsville, Texas), Monterrey (Mexico) (1846); Seven Days' (near Richmond), Bull Run II (Manassas, Virginia), Antietam, Fredericksburg (1862); Chancellorsville (near Fredericksburg), Gettysburg (1863); the Wilderness (south of the Rapidan), Spotsylvania, Cold Harbor (near Richmond), Petersburg (Virginia) (1864); Appomattox campaign (1865).
Principal battles: Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma (both near Brownsville, Texas) (1846); South Mountain (Maryland), Antietam, Fredericksburg (1862); Chancellorsville (near Fredericksburg), Brandy Station (near Culpeper), Gettysburg (1863); Westport (now part of Kansas City, Missouri) (1864).
Born near Louisville, Kentucky (January 27, 1826), the son of Zachary Taylor; he grew up on the frontier, and was educated at schools in Scotland and France; studied at Harvard before he graduated from Yale (1845); present with his father at the battles of Palo Alto (May 8, 1846) and Resaca de la Palma (May 9); afterward managed the family estates in Mississippi (1848-1849); set up his own sugar plantation in Louisiana; entered politics as a Democrat in the state legislature (1856-1861); attended the Louisiana secession convention (January 1861); appointed colonel of 9th Louisiana Infantry; traveled to Virginia (July), arriving too late to fight at First Bull Run (July 22); promoted to brigadier general (October); served under Gen.
Principal battles: Resaca de la Palma (near Brownsville), Monterrey (Mexico) (1846); Buena Vista (near Saltillo) (1847); Mill Springs (near Monticello, Kentucky), Shiloh, Perryville (Kentucky) (1862); Stones River, Chickamauga, Chattanooga (1863); Peachtree Creek (northeast of Atlanta), Nashville (1864).
Principal battles: Chippewa, Lundy's Lane (both in Ontario near Niagara Falls) (1814); Palo Alto, Resaca de la Palma (both near Brownsville, Texas), Monterrey (Mexico) (1846); Veracruz, Cerro Gordo (between Veracruz and Xalapa), Contreras, Churubusco, Molino del Rey (all three near Mexico City), Mexico City (1847).
Mariano Arista and defeated it (May 8); the following day he defeated Arista again at Resaca de la Palma (May 9); went on to occupy Matamoros (May 18); brevetted major general and named commander of the Army of the Rio Grande (July); crossed the Rio Grande toward Monterrey with 6,200 men (September); his two-pronged assault on the heavily fortified city and its 7,000-man garrison bogged down (September 21-22), and he consented to an armistice whereby the Mexican garrison withdrew and Taylor's troops entered the city (September 24); President Polk disapproved the armistice and ordered him to advance into Mexico; Taylor captured Saltillo (mid-November); required to send most of his regulars (4,000) and an equal number of volunteers to Gen.
Zachary Taylor at Palo Alto (May 8, 1846) and Resaca de la Palma (May 9), where he was brevetted 1st lieutenant; transferred to Gen.