reserve

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reserve

Ecology a tract of land set aside for the protection and conservation of wild animals, flowers, etc.

Reserve

 

(Russian zapas, reserve of the armed forces), those persons listed on military service records who have already had their term of active military service or who have been deferred from service for various reasons but who are fit for service in wartime. In the USSR, according to the Law on Compulsory Military Service of Oct. 12, 1967, the reserve is divided into two categories. The first category is made up of persons who have had at least one year of active military service and of servicemen who have participated in combat in defense of the USSR regardless of length of service. The second category is made up of servicemen who have had less than one year of active military service and such persons who have not been called for active military service for various reasons. Both categories of the reserve are divided into three age groups; the first group, to age 35; the second group, to age 45; and the third group, to age 50. Privates, sergeants, and master sergeants are in the reserve until age 50 if they are men and until age 40 for women that are listed cm military service records; officers, generals, admirals, marshals of combat arm, and admirals of the fleet are in the reserve until age 50–65 depending on their military rank. The officer reserve is formed of officers, generals, and admirals who are discharged from active military service and are registered in the reserve; soldiers, sailors, sergeants, and master sergeants who receive the rank of officer at the time they are discharged into the reserve or while in the reserve; and persons who have undergone military training in a civilian educational institution. Persons subject to military service who are in the reserve are called up periodically for refresher training periods and may be called for inspection assemblies.

M. G. ZHDANOV

reserve

[ri′zərv]
(computer science)
To assign portions of a computer memory and of input/output and storage devices to a specific computer program in a multiprogramming system.
References in periodicals archive ?
Best international practice is to use a 25- or 30-year lifecycle cost analysis period for the reserve fund forecast, as this covers the replacement of most major mechanical, electrical, and plumbing (MEP) items, such as chillers, lifts, and fire alarm panels.
However, recently, two courts have ruled on the interpretation of the Reserve Fund Law in two very important cases: Board of Managers of 184 Thompson St.
If an association has a need for funds in excess of the amounts set aside for future major repairs and replacements (for example, the roofs on all the buildings in a condominium complex are in need of replacement, and there is not enough in the reserve fund to cover the cost), they may levy a special assessment.
99) would create a single deficit-neutral reserve fund for energy efficiency and renewable energy that is virtually identical to the reserve described in H.R.
* "Economics of European Nuclear Power Plant Decommissioning Reserve Fund Management Models"
Mark Foley (R.-Fla.), is similar to that endorsed in an NCOIL Resolution in Support of Tax-Deductible Pre-Event Natural Disaster Reserve Funds and Federal Backup Insurance, adopted in November 2001.
He said antiterrorism measures should be funded with the 150 billion yen in reserve funds for the fiscal 2001 budget, adding not all the reserve funds will be used for the planned extra budget for the current fiscal year, which is to deal with unemployment and economic stimulus measures.
According to Pillow, the county will have to start trimming costs because the reserve funds won't last long if spending patterns aren't changed.
Working capital/fill-up reserve funds are necessary in the early months of initial project fill-up where it is normal to experience negative cash flow.
Regulators have approved a report that would create a formula to determine how much money insurers must set aside for catastrophe reserve funds.
As President McDonough just related, no Federal Reserve funds were put at risk, no promises were made by the Federal Reserve, and no individual firms were pressured to participate.
The reserve funds cover the losses and banks must still be shrewd since they are responsible for losses above the 14 percent the reserve fund covers.

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