fuel oil

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fuel oil

[′fyül ‚oil]
(materials)
A liquid product burned to generate heat, exclusive of oils with a flash point below 100°F (38°C); includes heating oils, stove oils, furnace oils, bunker fuel oils.
References in periodicals archive ?
content may not equal total residual fuel oil ending stocks and
The cost for a hydrocracker runs in the hundreds of millions of dollars, but by cracking residual fuel into diesel, refiners can earn an additional $15 or more for every barrel processed.
In turn, we believe that rising middle distillate crack spreads could add downward pressure on residual fuel oil cracks as we enter 2010, resulting in wider light-heavy spreads and wider sulphur and viscosity differentials among residual fuels.
Residual fuel oil was heavily used for vessel bunkering in 2000, which accounted for almost half of all sales.
The swap agreement establishes a price of $13 per barrel for 1.5 million barrels of residual fuel oil deliverd at New York Harbor.
Before removing the tanks, it is necessary to ensure any residual fuel in the tanks is safely emptied.
change by sulfur content may not equal total residual fuel oil
Residual Fuel Oil: 1974--75; 1980--91; and 1982--69.
Resid and natural gas compete for the electric generation market--maybe not as much as they used to when more electric generators made use of the bottom of the barrel residual fuel oil, but enough for the two to punch it out at the marketplace.
The price indices for October 25 show premium leaded petrol prices down to Euro 263.21 per 1,000 litres on average (compared with 264.81 in mid- October); the price of residual fuel oil about the same at Euro 143.36 per tonne (compared with 143.84 on October 11).
US residual fuel oil cracks to crude have narrowed to levels not seen in years as demand from the bunker sector supports prices sources quoted last week.
But even if owners accept the 50% price differential in switching from residual fuel to cleaner distillates, these ultra-low sulphur fuels are no panacea, says Eustlund.